Peace in Pokhara.

Trip Start Aug 04, 2009
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Trip End Oct 03, 2009


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Where I stayed
Pokhara Hotel

Flag of Nepal  ,
Sunday, September 20, 2009

Pokhara is an 8 hour bus ride away...it's a quite a slow ride with the winding roads that aren't paved all the way and some congestion (particularly getting oot of Kathmandu) as the roads are quite narrow.    All the local buses are jammed pack with peeps standing and on the roofs along with goats and bags.  My tourist bus (which is just an express bus) felt very luxurious.  The scenery was gorgeous.

I like Kathmandu but it was nice to be oot of it. Pokhara is set on lake Phewa and again is quite touristy.  It is defnitely more peaceful here though and less chaotic, more calm.  The tourist bit is on the lake side with lovely views of the lake and the surrounding hills/mountains.  It is here that is a good base to arrange many activites such as trekknig and rafting...and a lovely place to be based as well.  The first evening it absolutely pissed down with rain as the monsoon season is still coming to an end.  I was just walking 'home' or back to my hotel when it started and i thoroughly enjoyed walking in the rain.  I had no need to be dry, i was already sweaty and minging from my day and my clothes needed to be washed anways...it was a lovely stroll in the rain but no i didn't start singing.

I went for a hike up to the Peace Pagoda, "a large Buddhist stupa designed to provide a focus for people of all races and creeds, and to help unite them in their search for world peace", that was built by the Japanese.  It was first a short rowboat ride away across the lake. I hiked up with this Aus guy that i met then we mooched around the top for a while and then we went different ways to come down.  It was a brillant view from the top of the lake, the mountains and of Pokhara.  I had a lovely stroll down through the woods, around the lake and through some villages, across a river.

Nepalis are lovely peeps just like i heard.  They are very friendly, welcoming, open people that always say hello and smile...withoot intent.  I always get asked as usual 'where am i from' and they always say in return, 'oh canada, very nice country, very beautiful'.  Im not sure how they know that or if they say that to everyone but it's nice still. 

Majority of Nepalis, 70%, live rurally with little or no road access, in small towns or villages.  There are massive mountains everywhere so makes sense that walking is the main mode of transportation.  So traveling is no different here...trekking is the best way to see Nepal and the most common, and the safest for that matter.  I am not a huge fan of trekking so i will not be embarking on any long trek of 15 days or anything (which most tourists do) to see the mountains.  I think 2 days will be long enough for me... call me crazy but wouldn't be the first time or the last.   As long as i can experience and embrace true Nepalese villages and culture with my journey...then i will happy as usual.
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