Museo Frida Kahlo

Trip Start Mar 17, 2007
1
33
450
Trip End Ongoing


Loading Map
Map your own trip!
Map Options
Show trip route
Hide lines
shadow

Flag of Mexico  ,
Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Today, we discover the metro system, which is very good. It has numbers, colors and symbols (more than a forth of the population of Mexico City cannot read) and is cheap: (15 Eurocent for a ticket, no matter how far you go).

A disadvantage of being in e.g. Mexico is that we (or better I) do not know their paintures, sculptures, actors, presidents, ... . If you take a tour, they keep on talking of world famous Demadlagnifronadiegoniegare. I never heard of him/her and I forget 1 minute later.

I know Frida Kahlo, though and her husband Diego Rivera (whom I never liked). Frida was born beginning of the previous century and was one of those women with b.lls, rare for that point in time. She was badly handicapped (broke her bag as a child), a great artist and her curse (I think) was that she was married to another artiest Diego Rivera, who hurt her more than her back ever did. She died, aged 47, and then her (already ex-husband) wrote a poem for her, very romantic, after cheating on her 24 times, divorcing her and living in the same house with his mistress and their 2 children, the AH!

Afterwards, Dr T finds us a nice square with a market, beer and lunch.

Then we walk to the bus station, where we are going to take a bus to Acapulco the day after tomorrow. Or: we think we are walking there. We get completely lost, thanks to an erroneous map.

After MILES, we find the station and Dr T's solution is simple, no we are not booking, we come back when we leave and take the most expensive bus. OK.

No, there is a metro here. But where???? We follow arrows but we cannot find it. There is a market there too and a lady asks us: metro? On our "si", she explains. OK, Dr T was right we have to go up the stairs and then she rattles on (in Spanish of course) back down the stairs (the normal entrance is closed) and there it is.

We can do that. What I did not get: the metro is broken and we are redirected to buses. Tom Waites goes on in my head: everything is broken and nobody speaks English. We get on the bus (where to???) and get off at a station we can find on the map. I follow the crowd to the next bus. Hubby laughs his head off, those buses just go back where we come from, we have to take the metro now, hmmmm, I see now!

After getting home safely, we decide to go to Garibaldi Square, walking distance from our hotel, desrecommended by our tourist book, recommended by our guide yesterday. And indeed, a tourist trap but cozy. Life music at our table, on your request and if you pay for it. Pleasant evening with too much booze (for me).

We kind of decided to stay a day longer (normally we leave the day after tomorrow) and go to bed in the middle of the night, very happy.
Slideshow Report as Spam

Comments

vcvcv
vcvcv on

1/4 of the population are iliterate?
The colorful signs were desinged not just for the iliterate but also to help people who have short-sight vision.
One observation, the national literacy rate (among those who are 15 yrs old) is over the 90%. Mexico City should be higher than this because the iliteracy rates are concentrated in southern mexico (Chiapas and Oaxaca).

tonyandmarina
tonyandmarina on

Wayfinding
Back in 1969, when these wonderful signs were designed, the illiteracy rate was extremely high, and this was the primary reason for using logos.

The signs were designed by Lance Wyman, see
http://art.webesteem.pl/9/popwyman.php?id=8metrostations_04

Add Comment

Use this image in your site

Copy and paste this html: