Through the tunnel

Trip Start Mar 04, 2005
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Trip End Dec 31, 2014


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Where I stayed
Portage Valley RV & Cabins

Flag of United States  , Alaska
Monday, July 11, 2011

We actually spent two nights in a campground in Portage.  Portage, the city, no longer exists as it was pretty much wiped off the map in the 1964 earthquake.  We've been learning alot about this earthquake during our travels in and around the Kenai Peninsula.  Like how it registered 9.2 and lasted for anywhere from 3-5 minutes!!  In some areas the ground sank from 4-14 feet. 

Besides, Whittier is more fun to have as a marker on our map.  After all, there are only a couple of  ways to get there, one is by boat from Prince William Sound, yes, the same waterway we cruised out of Valdez.  The other ways are by train or tunnel.  Up until 2000 the tunnel was only accessible by train.  At that time they did a major reconstruction to allow vehicle traffic through.  Traffic is restricted to one direction at a time and the trains still take priority.  The Anson Anderson tunnel, originally constructed during WWII to move supplies from the Prince William Sound inland, is the longest tunnel in North America. 

Whittier itself is a very scenic small town.  With most of the businesses located along the small boat harbor and housing pretty much restricted to one 14 story apartment structure.  Interestingly enough the cruise ships come here, passengers disembark and head to the train which takes them to points inland.  The Alaska Marine Ferry also has a port here and we watched it being unloaded during our visit.  This prompted fond memories of our previous trip to Alaska when we traveled via the Marine Highway system. 


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