El Piramide del sol (burn)!

Trip Start Jun 30, 2008
1
5
9
Trip End Jul 07, 2008


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Where I stayed
La Casa de Tito

Flag of Mexico  , Central Mexico and Gulf Coast,
Thursday, July 3, 2008

Today was pretty glorious as far as days go. I didn't have to wake up at four in the morning, I got about ten hours of sleep, got to get going at my own pace, and then all that was on the agenda was heading to the pyramids of Teotihuacan. To top it all off it was a scorching 65-70 degrees outside in July. So we headed out for the pyramids, which is about a two hour drive from la casa de Tito, but if you could drive through it without stopping it would really only be about 45 minutes to an hour. Alas, this is Mexico City and if you are a traffic connoisseur then you should definitely make your way down here to indulge in some of the worlds finest. The drive was actually quite enjoyable and I found it very relaxing to drive through the city and see the outskirts. The poverty here becomes extremely apparent as you move to the outside of the city, and I thought to myself that it's kind of interesting how in the US generally speaking the rich live outside of the city and the poor live inside of it, but here it's the opposite. Wait... I know what you are thinking... Thank you captain obvious! Seriously though, I mean who'd a thunk? Right?

               I was finally given a name today that I believe I can make stick. A nice little salesman with a moveable store ran into me today at the corner of Temple of the sun blvd and Street of the dead, and he beckoned me by the name "El hombre del puro" (The man of the cigar). I was caught so off guard by his stroke of genius that I almost bought one of his trinkets, but in the end I decided names are free and that I would just keep it. So from now on I will only respond to el hombre del puro, Doctor*, or the obvious Lucas Miguel Miranda de la Hoya Veracruz Cardenas de los Santos Caminador el Segundo.

*This name does not take effect until May of 09, and before this time the person in context shall be known as Student Doctor, except in situations where other instructions have been provided by the National Board of Medical Educators.

                I don't really remember exactly when we arrived at the pyramids, but they are a pretty amazing sight from the highway. Before I talk about the pyramids though let me tell you that something very important happened today. Today, I finally figured out how to use my GPS unit, and in celebration I used up an entire single bar of four on the battery meter playing with it on the ride up and back and all the time in between at the pyramids. It's hard to really describe the experience that is Teotihuacan, but walking into the park you can't help but wonder what happened to a culture of people that were able to build such a magnificent city. We mosied about, making our way to the Temple of the Sun slowly, taking in the views from different vantage points as if to try and implant these short term photos into our long term memories. The stones were overgrown with different plants and flowers in some places, there were ongoing excavations going on in others, and in others we could glimpse some of what this mysterious civilization was able to see every day. Of course the main Street (Cadera de los muertos) was teeming with eager junk gypsies and healthy amount of tourists, most of which could be seen struggling in a line to the top of the Temple of the Sun. I felt like a kid again; ready to run up and down the ruins of Tikal for a second time.

                The first temple conquered was the Temple of the Sun. when we reached the top I set a waypoint on my GPS, pushed my way to an open area, sat down, and pulled out a Montecristo Petit Edmundo that I immediately lit up (with a little help from the gf holding the match while I blocked the breeze). I basqued in my glory, hoping that I wasn't breaking some law by smoking at the top of this historic monument. My mind was put to ease by the other tourists I began to see lighting up their death sticks around me, but I didn't let the stench of their garbage ruin my Olympic torch of tobacco. We enjoyed the view from the top for quite a while, and to try and describe it would be a grave error on my behalf, so I have provided photos for your viewing pleasure. As I descended the temple I could be seen from a mile away with a smile as wide as the Amazon with smoke billowing from my nostrils on every seventh step, or at least that's the way it will go down in the history books.

                Little did I know that while I was making a fragrant sacrifice to the Gods of the Sun, they began to smile back quite heavily with the UV-B rays of appreciation. So great was their joy that they sent their rays through the cloudy sky to be enjoyed by all of the Vitamin D deprived individuals lurking around the temples. I guess they didn't realize that I was a gringo tourist and not a local, because when I got home and looked in the mirror this evening I brought new meaning to the word red man. Thank God the Aloe is free here! Besides the sunburn though, the day ended up being one for the books. We took in the Temple of the Moon, the museum,  some other temple whose name I can't remember, and beat the afternoon rain to the restaurant La Gruta, where we enjoyed the best Mexican food I have had in a long time (including San Antonio). I f I could have bought their Red salsa by the gallon I would have had to buy another bag to send it under the plane in, because it was to die for. I might not kill for pumps, I might not kill for drugs, but if you had a little cup of this salsa and weren't willing to share it you might consider yourself a dead man. This stuff definitely made me want to dance and take off my underpants ( Thanks Eminem)!

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