Week of Hiking and Biking in Cuyahoga Valley

Trip Start May 27, 2009
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62
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Trip End Sep 19, 2013


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Flag of United States  , Ohio
Saturday, August 15, 2009

The Ohio and Erie Canal opened in 1827 between Cleveland and Akron, parallel to and partly watered by the Cuyahoga River. It replaced the river as the primary transportation artery. It was part of the national system of canals connecting the East Coast and Midwest. The canals launched Midwest commercial development and enabled farmers to ship agricultural products to the eastern markets. The towns of Boston and Peninsula boomed with canal-related industry. Cleveland and Akron flourished. More people moved in, looking for jobs and fortunes. By the 1860s, railroads were prevalent and soon replaced the canal as the major route for commerce, industry, and travel. Running through the valley, the railroad led to the canal's eventual demise, but it also contributed to the cities' growth. As the cities grew, the Cuyahoga Valley took on a new significance. The Valley became a place of refuge - a place to refresh body and spirit.

Today, the historic Ohio and Erie Canal and its legacy are central to the Ohio and Erie Canalway. The parks, museums, and attractions that surround the historic canal are now a National Heritage Area. Here one can experience trails, trains, and America's byways, working rivers and great lakes, and green spaces.

Today, you can experience the Ohio and Erie canalway by driving it riding the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad or walking, hiking or biking the Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath trail. The Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP) is on 33,000 acres and is the third most visited national park in the country.

There are over 125 miles of hiking trails in the CNVP. The three most popular are: Bradywine Falls, The Ledges, and Oak Hills. The American Hiking Association has named a portion of the trail as one of the top ten in the country.

In addition, there are over 73 miles of biking trails in the CVNP. You can bike one way and return by train using the CVSR's Bike Aboard Service. Reference attached pictures.
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