University of Manchester

Trip Start Mar 31, 2012
1
8
13
Trip End Apr 24, 2012


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Friday, April 13, 2012

After gathering the group at the hotel and stopping to get our caffeine fix with an ice cold coca cola, we headed to the University of Manchester. Upon arrival we met with Layla Fattah, a clinical pharmacist and educational training professor for the college. We started off the morning discussing the pharmacy program at the University of Manchester. She stated that the students must apply and interview to get into the college of pharmacy program. They accept 180 students in each class and can obtain a pharmacy degree after 5 years of schooling. She stated that the last year of the program is called a pre-registration year, during which the students must work in various pharmacy settings that are similiar to our rotations. Students are then required to take a licensing exam after the last year in order to become a practicing pharmacist. It was very interesting throughout the conversation to compare and contrast their pharmacy program to ours. After Layla finished her presentation, we briefly discussed the set-up of the hospital with a question and answer session.

Next on the tour, Jane Law, the director of pharmacy at the hospital, presented a powerpoint presentation. She started off with a few history tidbits then showed us some famous tourist sites in Manchester. She then spoke about the branches of pharmacy within their hospital system. It was quite an extensive, but she broke each part down for us and was eager to answer any questions we could come up with. After explaining how the free healthcare system worked we couldn't help but ask questions. When asked about wait-times, Jane stated that the hospital goals include: No more than 4 hours in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department, no more than 2 weeks before initiating cancer treatment, and no more than 18 weeks from a doctors referral to medical treatment. We all were quite shocked by these goals since we often have access to these services on the day we are seen in the clinic. Jane stated that only about 5-10% of English residents have private health insurance which means wait-times to receive medical services can be quite long. We ended by talking about prescription medications that are picked up at the local pharmacies. She stated that each medication costs the customer about $10 no matter what the cost of the prescription. Children under 18 years of age, customers over 65 years of age, pregnant mothers, those with chronic medical conditions, and those on income support receive all medications for free.

Next on the tour, we broke into groups of 5 and went on a tour of the hospital pharmacy, as well as a glimps into what a pharmacists role in the hospital setting. We looked at clean rooms, a clinical trial room, a medical information office, and saw how medications are stored and prepared within the hospital.

Next we broke into pairs and went to different wards of the pharmacy with different members of the pharmacy staff. Laura and I went to the cardiology ward and saw the Cath Lab. We both had a good chuckle when the tour guide said "Time is Muscle" when referring to cardiac issues since we heard this phrase numerous times from Dr. Clem during our schooling. The others had nothing but good things to say about their ward tours.

After walking through the various hospital wards we finished up with a brief question session and thanked everyone for a great day. Tomorrow we will head to Manchester Metropolitan University to meet with Dr. Gethin Evans and Martin and Anna Whaley.
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Comments

Stacy on

Sounds like a great trip so far. Say hello to Martin, Anna and Gethin from me. Hope you have a great day in Chester, it was one of my favorite stops in England.

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