A day in our life...

Trip Start Jun 16, 2012
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Trip End Ongoing


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Flag of Bahamas  , Out Islands,
Friday, January 18, 2013

One of the most common questions we hear from friends back home is:

What do you DO all day?!?!

Below is a video that reveals all. Well, actually it is the compilation of events that occurred over several days. The idea is to help you understand of how "ordinary" the cruising life can be; hopefully spiced with our usual sense of humor.

If you are interested in a good read on the subject we can recommend the book: An Embarrassment of Mangoes by Ann Vanderhoof. It is the story of a Canadian Couple who take 2 years off from their land-based life to move aboard their boat and sail from Toronto to Trinidad and back.

http://www.amazon.com/Embarrassment-Mangoes-Caribbean-Interlude/dp/0767914279/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1358596845&sr=1-1&keywords=an+embarrassment+of+mangoes

The book is written from the perspective of a women who did not start out as a sailor but became one during the trip. She loves to cook.  The book includes a recipe at the end of each chapter for new foods she discovers along the way. The couple befriend and interact with locals in the places they visit; immersing themselves in the culture. It is a tour of the Caribbean. It was a best seller in Canada and got some great reviews. We loved it.


To quote Ms Vanderhoof after her first year living aboard their sailboat “Receta” with Steve, her spouse:


“This year has given us a closeness, a pleasure in each others company, that I know many couples yearn for. After all, day in and day out now, we're regularly trusting each other with our very lives.

We talk together more, about more things. The past. The future. Our hopes, fears (still mostly mine), dreams. And the weather, always still the weather. We discuss in detail, what we're seeing and what we're reading. I laugh now at one of my concerns before we set off on the trip: without the stimulus of our related jobs, I worried that Steve and I would have little to talk about each night at dinner. Ludicrous. Removed from the breathless pace of our old life, we have created space for a breadth of ideas and interests... I am more aware of the moods and rhythms of the natural world around me than I every have been, or probably ever will be.

This trip is allowing the sides of ourselves we like best to flourish. Perhaps most amazingly, I have slowed down. Time has become more fluid, less rigid. Our days unfold, they don't just bing-bang, do-this, do-that happen. I'm content to do nothing for stretches. I can just lay on the settee with my legs stretched out in front of me, watching the sky through the hatch. I can stare at the water for  hours, utterly content. Me.  Unbelievable. How will I cope in the real world? To which Steve responds, “This is the real world”.

Here to our great satisfaction, we are no longer defined by our jobs. In our former life, we would meet people and one of the first questions would be: “What do you do?”.  To people in our new world, we have no last names and no professions. We are merely “Ann and Steve on Receta” - and that says it all. “

Warmly,

Pierce and Ruth on Wabi Sabi
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