Life J-tepe style

Trip Start Sep 04, 2009
1
14
Trip End Feb 19, 2010


Loading Map
Map your own trip!
Map Options
Show trip route
Hide lines
shadow
Where I stayed
B-Camp

Flag of Nicaragua  , Carazo,
Thursday, December 3, 2009

This week is the celebration of Maria's Conception of Jesus. The actual holiday itself does not take place until the 7th of December, however, people here find any reason to party.
After a long day of working in the hospitals, I get to come home and relax to the soothing sounds of fireworks, car horns, carolers (who should keep their day jobs), marching bands and loud speaker promocions. Oh yes, and the armadillo above my bed seems to be startled by all this rukus, as it has become hyperactive and sounds like an elephant storming around the attic. This morning there was a guy playing his african-style drum at 6am. Why, I ask you. WHY?!?!?
So, all I can say is this: Thank you Maria, thank you very much for Jesus, now can you tell everyone to SHUT UP!

Hospital life is pretty standard, lots of babies, dengue, machete injuries, etc. HOWEVER, I was fortunate enough to stand in on some orthopedic surgeries, which I must say, made me think of  "Tool Time," but we arent remodeling cars or furniture. I can see the doctor thinking, as he is re-attaching sawed or macheted off limbs/fingers/wtv, "if I pull this tendon here, which finger/toe/etc moves" and then from there he begins to reattach things. Very neat how simple, and yet extremely complex the body is all at once.

Homelife is pretty good, I am so pooped that I generally am asleep by 8:30/9pm at the latest. I have realized that I am constantly convered in bugs, infact as I speak there are 5 ants running across my screen and keyboard, and I totally dont even notice any more. In the morning, I dust the bugs of shoes, toothbrush, hairbrush, clothes, etc.. and it just seems like a totally normal process to me. In essence, I am turning into a bush woman... awesome.
There is also a very complex driving system here which I have been trying to figure out. There are no street signs or traffic lights (well there is one in Jinotepe, but I have no idea how it works), pedestrian cross walks or sufficient sidewalks. The road is constantly cluttered with vans, semi-trucks, horse carts, tuk-tuks, cyclists, bike-carts, pedestrians, dogs, cats, horses, goats... and probably a few others I have forgotten. Each car, it seems, is equiped with multiple horns. One is a chirping horn, which says "Hey! Get on in!" (if it is a truck/collectivo), another quick beep to say "hello" to EVERYONE who passes, and a third that says "MOVE OR I WILL MOW YOUR ASS DOWN."  There are about a hundred in between that I have figured out. For example, there is this repeated beeping that I think means " I see the stop sign, but I am not stopping." However, it is extremely similar to the one that means "MOVE, DOG, MOVE!" It's no wonder they start driving here at the age of 8, takes a lifetime to learn the horn codes. And then there are the chariot races... what a sight this was. There were six, wooden, rickety as all hell, horse-drawn buggies being driven by young boys racing down the pan american highway. There were two boys per team, one to drive, and the other to cling to the little bundle of sticks their parents had probably told them to go and pick up from a neighbors. So, what do you do when you are out on a errand, and you see five other compadres all doing the same, well, according to the Nica adolescent boy population, you race eachother home on the country's most dangerous road. Sounds reasonable right. And, to top it off, the only safety inspection the buggies would pass, would be Air Care.  

The family is arriving next week for the holidays, so I should have lots to report once they get here, however, for now, my life is not vastly interesting. I will be sure to be a little more frequent with the updates, I have been slacking lately.. Love and miss you all!
Report as Spam

Use this image in your site

Copy and paste this html: