A Christian Village

Trip Start Mar 04, 2007
1
13
34
Trip End Jun 15, 2007


Loading Map
Map your own trip!
Show trip route
Hide lines
shadow

Flag of Palestinian Territory  ,
Sunday, April 1, 2007

Taybeh

This Christian village sits high in the Judean Mountains on the edge of what was once the border between Samaria and Judea. Local lore places Jesus and the disciples here as they traveled to Jerusalem for the final time. The tallest mountain sits across a small valley and is now occupied by the Israeli army.

The main industry is a micro brewery which makes and distributes the only Palestinian beer to Palestine and Europe. Taybeh Beer is made by a master brewer seen at the right in this photo (and yes, it has tastes good.)

They also distribute virgin olive oil to the same markets.  The olive oil trade came during the second infatida when local residents paid the Christian school in olive oil since they had no cash.  The olive oil needed a market so the Khoury brothers and their brewery stepped up and began selling it in Europe.  This supplied cash to the school and parents were able to keep their children in school. Of course, I bought a bottle!

The St. George Church dates from the 4th century when Helene, Constantine's mother, was touring the Holy Land and marking the sites where Jesus was.  The mosaics uncovered by French students help to date the church.  Across from the site sits the newer church.
It was interesting being in a Christian village without a mosque and hearing the Christian bells ringing in unison across the hills.  It was a clear day and we could see the Dead Sea; on a clear night you ca see the lights of Jerusalem and Amman, Jordan from the mountain 1000 meters or 3280 feet above sea level.
Slideshow Report as Spam

Comments

locarl
locarl on

Taybeh
Trish, I was most interested in your story about Taybeh. In the 20s, the Friends had schools 'in the Muslim villages of Bireh, Attara and Beitunia, and the Christian village of Taiyibeh.' Then Aunt Mildred and Na'meh Shahla opened new schools in the Muslim villages of Dura and Giba. The teachers were Arab Christians, most of them former students of Ramallah Girls School. 'Although their belief in Christ's love for all people was the foundation of the teachers' lives, there was no attempt to force Christian doctrine upon the children' (Ramallah Teacher, Lois Jordan). I don't know when they closed the little village schools. Lois

Mike Salim on

I wish I could go visit there.. that's my home town but I've never been there before.. my dad was born there but moved from there to go to the states and now we reside in Cleveland.. but its my dream to go there and visit!

Add Comment

Use this image in your site

Copy and paste this html: