"Grow Ops and Whores" in Pamukkale?

Trip Start Aug 19, 2012
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Trip End Ongoing


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Where I stayed

Flag of Turkey  , Denizli,
Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Yes, that's right folks!  Our Turkish guide really did use the words "grow ops" and "whores" during our tour.  Let's just say his "Turklish" wasn't exactly up to snuff for the day.  We did several double takes during the tour when he used questionable terminology.  We even think he used a swear word or two.  My theory?  The person who trained him decided to play a nasty trick, and taught him the wrong words to use whenever he led tour groups.

Thank goodness nobody knocked on our hotel room door to see if their "feminine services" would be needed for the evening.  Pamukkale is apparently the place to be if you want these sorts of things...

What we DID need for the evening was heat though.  And our room was freezing despite turning up the heater to 30 degrees celsius.  It didn't help that our shower water was lukewarm at best.  So what does the establishment do to remedy this?  They gave us an industrial grade outdoor heater (the kind you can use on a patio), which we cranked up in our room.  We both didn't wear earplugs that night just in case a fire broke out.

Don't worry, we're still alive.

But BEFORE we thought we might burn to death, we froze our tushies off at the famous travertine.  WHAT is a travertine you may ask?  Why, let me tell you!  (I had no idea before either).  In Pamukkale, it's basically mineral laden water that flows over rocks/land that deposits those minerals over time to form what you see in the pics on this blog.  At Pamukkale (or Hieropolis, the ancient name of the city), it's calcium carbonate deposits that make it all look like snow.  The water is hot spring water that's 25 degrees celsius.  I decided that this would likely be the only time I'd have the chance to walk in the water and on the travertine, so I did!  (I also decided to go past a warning sign and walk through some ruins, which we later found out was prohibited because it was an excavation site.  Oops!  I don't read Turkish!)

The water was warm, but by the time I got back to the walkway, my feet were wet and frozen.  But it was worth it.  It was so neat to stand in the aqua blue warm water, and kick up the white calcium carbonate powder that had settled in the pools.  I found out later that the slippery jelly-like substance everywhere was also calcium carbonate that hadn't solidified yet.  Super neat and satisfied the geeky part of me.  I apologize to those who are not geeky.

So, despite the miserable, freezing, very wet conditions, we had a great time at Pamukkale (grow ops, whores, and all).
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