Two Girls In A Honda

Trip Start Jan 30, 2011
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211
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Trip End Nov 16, 2011


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Flag of United States  , Texas
Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Having politely declined the basketball player's offer of paying for everything if I spent the day with him, I spent the day my host and her family in order to see all San Antonio has to offer. I spent a couple of hours exploring Downtown whilst they did their chores, and managed to see everything from the not exactly awe-inspiring Tower of the Americas to the tacky Mercado that had everything from leather purses with 'Mexico’ scrawled on them, to Mexican wrestler masks.  I wasted some of my time by mistaking the correct lift to get down the tower, eventually realising that the one around the corner was taking people up and down a lot quicker than the one I’d been waiting in front of for twenty minutes.

The Mercado did have such useful accessories as a leather clip-on gun holder that I debated getting to double as a mascara holder, and a handy leather bible holder; neither of which ended up in my shopping basket.  As all of the offerings declared their Mexican origin, I figured I’d wait until I ever get there to get it myself, although once again I was told with blonde hair and fair skin I shouldn’t go as I’d be a prime target for kidnap.  That would mean my parents would be tested as to how much they could pay for my ransom and have to ask the government, but seeing as the British government doesn’t tend to have a good history for bailing out kidnapped people I’ll give it a miss. 

I dropped into a Mexican bakery at the Mercado for some lunch, they only served sweet stuff to take away, and as I was meeting Sarah and the children in fifteen minutes I opted for a cinnamon croissant that was almost hard, but I think it was meant to be that way, along with a Mexican hot chocolate.  I couldn’t resist what had tasted so good back in Portland, even if it was thirty-three degrees outside.  I didn’t regret my hot beverage choice, even if I was sweating in Milam Square whilst drinking it, as I was soon in the air-conditioned comfort of the car and heading to the Japanese Tea Garden.  It was a quiet alternative to the bustling Mercado, but offered no shade from the midday sun as we looked at the dried-up waterfall and carp as big as ducks. 

Sarah then took me to Wendy’s for my first frosty, which I thought it was a milkshake but turned out to be like pure ice-cream after you mix it up in a bowl, but I couldn’t complain as it offered sweet relief on my suddenly scratchy throat.

Next stop was the infamous boot-seller, Cavender’s, to try on the quintessential cowboy boots and hats, unfortunately they didn’t have any chaps or spurs, but the owner seemed happy to humour us as we wandered around in the most outrageous designs.  I was tempted by some of the less expensive boots, but at $129 I still couldn’t justify them, especially when considering how much wear they’d actually get in Telford; Halloween’s only once a year after all.    

After discovering the surprisingly tasty Texan culinary dish ‘Frito Pie,’ layers of Fritos (crisps), chilli con carne, and cheese, I joined Sarah on a jaunt out to The Alamo Draught House to watch the Ryan Gosling film ‘Drive’ that I’d not caught at TIFF.  Brenda and Carli had mentioned the same chain back in Austin, but it seemed only right I should be visiting it in the city where the Alamo actually was.  Whilst you watch the film as in any cinema, you are also served alcohol and food whilst doing so; the soft drinks also came with free refills, but when the glasses are nearly a litre in size you’re lucky to finish even one.  Not only did we have some tasty beer, but they also offered previews linked to the film rather than just adverts for upcoming films, which included Ryan Gosling being interviewed whilst playing a Ucayali, as well as many scenes of cars being driven exceedingly fast around tracks.  It was a good film, but with the absence of much dialogue and the focus on atmosphere and cinematography it seemed to be more of an arty film than a thinker; it was also extremely graphic, sometimes too graphic, but it certainly kept us entertained for a couple of hours.

Before the film, warnings littered the screen about no talking, texting, or tweeting during the movie or you risked being ejected, but when a baby started gurgling nobody said anything to the mother; the movie started at ten, I’m not sure why anybody would think it was a good idea to bring a baby, especially to one that included scenes of horrific violence. At times the film reminded me of the horror film I’d seen at TIFF, ‘You’re Next,’ which also liked to use new and inventive ways of killing people such as using forks in eyes and blenders on heads. 

Sarah took me on a quick tour of San Antonio following the film, but stopped short of going too far south because ‘after all [we’re] two white girls in a Honda.’
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