Girls power, or so they say...

Trip Start Oct 08, 2007
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Trip End Dec 16, 2008


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Flag of China  ,
Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Lugo Hu is probably the most remote lake I've washed my cloths in. It is 8 hours of Anxious Torturous Drive (according to the road signs) from Lijiang. I come here to find the last matriarchal society in the world. I'm hoping to meet some cool galls, but at the end I only meet guys. One of the guys offers me a marriage. Got to be careful though. Mosu marriage is not quite so marriage. Mosu galls allegedly don't care about diamond rings and weddings. They spend their nights with their "husbands", but in the morning the husbands go back home to mommy, hens the term "walking marriage". While couple can spend years in monogamous relationship, no one seeks financial responsibility from the father. The women never leave their parent's homes, and raise the children independently. They can afford it, because only women are allowed to inherit, and the family is expected to help. At the end, the guys have to help raising their sister's kids, so it is kind of hard to avoid responsibility. I think these galls have nailed it. Any ways, I kindly refuse to be married that way for cultural differences, but frankly because he is not very hot at all.

I spent one whole day by the lake. I wash my cloths with the local ladies, but when they go topless to wash their hair, I retreat to the shadow of a tree and sleep for the rest of the afternoon. Oh, what a wonderful nap that was. Lugu Hu is such and idyllic place - quiet, pretty, clean. The shores of the lake are rimmed by tiny water lilies. A fishing boat makes a slow zip across in the late afternoon. No one seems to be in a hurry.

On day two Penny (an Australian gall I met on the TLG trek) and I go round the lake to several other villages. It is all geared for tourists, but there aren't very many of them, so we enjoy the walk, although climbing over those hills leaves us breathless. It is quite high up here. In the evening we go to see the only show in town - the singing and dancing by Mosu people. It is the epiphany of a fake tourist attraction, but there is nothing else to do, so... It turns out to be most entertaining. After the official performance, the Mosu invite the Han tourist to a sing off. The two groups face each other standing in the middle of the  large inside yard and the sing of begins. The Han's are doing quite well under the passionate leadership of an energetic lady in a short hair and orange top. Eventually, they run out of songs, so the group decides to sing the A-B-C-D-E-F-G song. The Mosu response comes swiftly - "Happy Birthday to you". We are dying laughing.

The owner of the establishment sends a free beer to our table, so eventually we join him for some good hands-waiving conversation, sunflower seeds and shots of beer. AJ is 35-year old han Chinese. That's as far as our linguistic abilities take us. The night extends into some more beer drinking. AJ's Mosu friend and employee joins us when the bar is completely shut down. Eventually we move outside for a BBQ of pork liver, brain, and I don't want to know what else. This is a fine conclusion of our culinary explorations. We had tried stir fried frogs and water lilies earlier. Upon finishing a second bottle of the local brandy we most charmingly excuse ourselves and stroll in straight-ish line to our guest house. The trip back to Lijiang is most anxious and torturous the following day.

***

WORLD CHANGE STARTS WITH EDUCATED CHILDREN! Give a girl the life long gift of education! Support my appeal 100 GIRLS BACK TO SCHOOL! Donate at: www.justgiving.com/100GirlsBackToSchool
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Hugs & Kisses, Vik
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