Sri Lanka -Day 11

Trip Start Jan 04, 2013
1
11
20
Trip End Jan 26, 2013


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Flag of Sri Lanka  , Uva Province,
Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Dawn's warmth greets us after a chilly nights sleep under our mosquito net. We make our way down to the dining area and meet Connie for one of the biggest breakfast's I ever saw. Hoppers, egg hoppers, sting hoppers, dhal, coconut sambol, egg curry, rottys, bananas, papaya and coffee.

Bellies overstuffed we prepare for a leisurely day of exploring. We call Nalin, the tuk tuk driver we met yesterday, and arrange for him to take us to a local tea factory to see how they processes the famous Ceylon tea. The little tuk tuk engine squeals as it struggles to carry its four passengers up the steep switchbacks up to the factory. Upon arrival we don very unflattering green coats and being our tour.

The leaves are first blown dry to remove excess moisture, then rolled to breakup the leaves and stems. The various grades are then left to ferment before being sent to an oven to stop the fermentation process. The leaves are then shaken into various sizes before being packaged and shipped off to Colombo for auction. More than I ever needed to know about tea. All that matters is that my favourite (as discover during our tea tasting) is the FBOP (flowery broken orange pekoe), a "tippy tea".

Guided tour complete we take a stroll through the tea fields to a spot commonly referred to as Little Adams Peak. Along the way we see numerous tea pickers making their way up the steep hillside aided only by a large stick. I'm not sure what help the stick provides as all they seem to do with it is toss it in font of them a few yards and then walk up to it. Along the way they clip off the green tea leaves and toss then into big nylon sacks, which they carry on their backs strapped to their heads. Most of the pickers we see are women. The few men we spot along the hillside are standing in the shade of various trees yelling out orders.

We then make our way back into town and prepare for our Ayurvedic treatment. These healing arts are more than 2,500 years old and claim to provide relief for all kinds of ailments. Herbs, spices, oils and metals are applied to the body to produce a balance in you inner dosha (life force). Instead of the full treatment we opt for the express balance procedure.

The treatment goes as follows. First strip down to your skives and wrap a towel around your waist. Next step into a large pizza oven heated to a steamy temperature filled with 50 different herbs and spices (addition of Japanese tourists optional). Sit for 15 minutes until well seasoned, next move to a chair, apply oils to scalp and using fingers rub thoroughly until well combined. Move to a flat working surface and liberally apply oils making sure everything (well almost everything) is well coated. Finally apply scrub to face to remove excesses tissue. Seasoned, greases and tenderized, your dosha should now be well balanced.

We then slither our way back to the guesthouse and take a long cleansing shower. With our life force well balance we decide we can indulge in a few cocktails and make our way to Chill Cafe. Connie and I enjoy a Sri Lanka Special (arak, ginger ale, lime) and Alex has a passion fruit mojito. These are so tasty we decide to have another. Those are so tasty we decide to have dinner at the Chill Cafe. Another round of cocktails, a bottle of wine and three orders of Lamprais (rice meat and vegetables, slowly cooked in a banana leaf). Feeling slightly less balanced than when we started we decide its time to call it a night.
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Comments

Karen on

Sounds like a wonderful day, oh how I wish I could have been there to sip on a passion fruit cocktail!

karen on

Love this post too funny lol pizza oven lol still laughing

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