Monkey Sticks and Hippie Chicks

Trip Start Feb 02, 2011
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Trip End Feb 24, 2011


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Flag of India  , Rajasthan,
Monday, February 21, 2011

Kasia and I woke up at 7am and walked down the quiet dirt road to Yogi's Garden where we enjoyed a two-hour yoga session in the tiny yard of a French woman who had to stop twice in order to chase away the wild white monkeys with a large white stick. Those animals overrun the entire city but apparently most of them are halrmless. It was a beautiful experience and well worth the 300 rupees ($6.00). Afterwards we went next door where a sign advertised waffles (!!!) but of course they were not making them that day so we went to a place that advertized pancakes, only to discover our plates covered in crepes. I was excited to see a peanut butter pancake on their menu but they had no peanut butter so I went with Nutella. I ordered a ginger lemon honey tea from the menu but they had no honey so I went with just a ginger lemon tea. When it arrived I found that it was missing the ginger and when I explained this to the waiter he just gave me a bobblehead and a smile. "Okay, no problem."

(“No problem, don’t worry.” The reason why this country has so many problems is because no one is worrying.)

The rest of the afternoon was spent wandering through the city streets taking pictures and shopping. Kasia bought some nice cheap clothes and I finally found a few cool locks for myself (one of them being a three-key-lock! A total score for 1200 rupees!) and it was so relaxing and nice. Both Udaipur and Pushkar are full of the merchants who try to lure you in with the “Where are you from?” line so by now we're just having fun with it. “Earth!” “China!” “We’re from here!”

We walked barefoot along the dirty, neglected ghats (them's the rules!) and discussed how sad it was to see such little care taken in these holy areas which they place so much faith in. And then you have the soulless thieves that hang outside of the ghats luring tourists in by telling them they have to bring in flowers as an offering and then charging them for their false claims. It’s sickening. I just kept telling them “Religion is free!” even though it rarely is. Ten thousand deities and they all have followers with longer arms and bigger palms than the last.

For lunch we had amazing falafels for 50 rupees each (at a place who claimed to be the first falafel restaurant in the city) and then headed back to the hotel to relax a bit and refuel for dinner. A few hours later we walked down to have dinner at a nice Israeli restaurant and then ended the night drinking Kingfishers at the pizza place from last night.

The road between the hotel and the town area is a dirt road lined with farms, a few other hotels, and tons of animals. On our way to the restaurant the city lost power (which is quite normal in these small cities) and there we were in complete darkness amongst the sounds of pigs, cows, camels, goats, dogs, monkeys and whatever else was lurking around us. Luckily I had my iphone which has a flashlight app, and we were able to see a few feet in front of us until the power returned a few minutes later. At that moment I tried to repress any memories I had of watching 'An American Werewolf in London’ when I was younger. =)

This is easily one of the better cities we visited despite their crazy religious rules (our hotel won’t even serve eggs because it’s an animal by-product). Due to the lax marijuana laws you find the streets crowded with white granola hippies and tons of Israelis. I did more people photography here than in any other city, and I finally got my shot of a man reading a newspaper. I am so tired of taking pics and doubt I’ll take many more. I guess I figure that if I don’t have it in the 24 gigs I’ve taken it’s not worth capturing. ; )
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