To start i'd like to tell you that i've ...

Trip Start Aug 08, 2002
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Trip End Feb 01, 2004


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Flag of United States  , California
Tuesday, October 29, 2002

To start, I'd like to tell you that I've uploaded my pictures, you'll find them in the first entry of each location where I took them. There's also a little bit of text to let you know about the photo.

Sacramento. We visited it this weekend, and, having been, I'm glad that I didn't bother stopping off enroute. Sacarmento is the state capitol of California. On our arrival we had an interesting problem just getting into Sacramento (despite my parents having been there before). We got off the freeway and we drove around and around, finally seeing the tall buildings that signfied downtown. Keeping them in sight, we circled round and round, desperately trying to get to them.

Eventually we made it and, again driving round and round, found our way to the river, and the Old Sacramento. This is an area which is pretty much preserved as it was in the 1800s, a steam railway, a school house, numerous buildings that were old stores and saloons and are now stores and restaurants.

We stopped off at the school house because mum had told me about a list of rules there, not for the pupils, but for the teachers! Now, if you think being a teacher these days is tough, check out some of these rules:

1872
Teachers each day will fill lamps, clean chimneys.
Each teacher will bring a bucket of water and scuttle of coal for the days session.
Men teachers may take one evening each week for courting purposes, or two evenings a week if they go to church regularly.
After ten hours in school, the teachers may spend the remaining time reading the Bible or other good books.
Every teacher should lay aside from each pay a goodly sum of his earnings for his benefit during his declining years so that he will not become a burden on society.
Any teacher who smokes, uses liquor in any form, frequents pool or public halls, or gets shaved in a barber shop will give good reason to suspect his worth, intention, integrity and honesty.
etc

1886
Duties: (before and after school sessions)
1 - Wash windows and clean classroom with soap and water at least once a week.
etc
Apparel: (forbidden to wear in public at all times)
Women: bathing costume, bloomers for cycling, skirts slit to expose ankles, bustle extended over 10 inches.
Men: detachable collar and necktie removed from shirt, etc
Conduct: (cause for immediate dismissal)
Smoking of cigarettes, use of spirits, frequenting pool parlors and public dance halls.
Marriage or other unseemly behavior by women teachers.
Joining a feminist movement such as the suffragettes.

Now, assuming you didn't break any of these rules and laboured 'faithfully and without fault for five years [you] will be given an increase of twenty-five cents a week in his pay, providing the Board of Education approves.'

And they think it's bad now!

Anyway, we wandered around the shops and then stopped off at the Railway Museum. Lots of trains. Quite interesting. We headed for the hotel afterwards.

Now, due to mum's expertise with Priceline.com, we were staying at the Hyatt. As we found it through the tangle of one-way streets, and then found somewhere to park ($24 valet at the hotel, $17 self-park, we found a two hour limit place on the street as it was after 4 and it ceased at 6, and no charge for sundays. Cost us $1.25.) we looked toward the hotel (it was in sight of the car). We started to hear drumming. A party emerged from the hotel entrance, along with a guy on a horse! It was an Indian (dots not feathers) wedding, the groom was on the horse, two guys were drumming away, and about 25-30 people were dancing about around, what must have been, a very disturbed horse, in the middle of Sacramento (across the street from the Capitol building).

The following day (Sunday) we headed across the road to the Capitol building for a free tour. The building was modelled on the white house, but was never completed (partly because of funds, partly for politcal reasons - the offical entrance would have been on the second floor, up a long flight of steps like the white house, but because the governers office was on the first floor, he argued it would look like he was in the basement so they didn't put the steps in, but the door's there). It was an interesting place, with some rooms restored to their orginal state. They have a mosaic floor, which was taken out and cleaned during two seperate 6 year renovations, all the blocks being painstakingly numbered before cleaning and replacing. It doesn't sound impressive until you reaslise that this floor is something like 6 feet wide, by 50 feet long and contains several hundred thousand pieces (they did tell me, but I forgot). We also got to see the various voting and policy rooms (each with King and Queen chairs as the American system was based on our parliamentary system, but no one sits in them), and portraits of all the governors - something they get as a leaving present, they get to pick the artist, the people pay for it - ain't that nice.

After the tour, which was made even more interesting by a couple of gay guys who couldn't keep their hands off each other, we drove by Fort Sutter and headed for home.
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