Our time on the Island

Trip Start Jan 04, 2013
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13
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Trip End May 01, 2013


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Flag of Australia  , South Australia,
Saturday, February 23, 2013

The ship left 11 PM from Adelaide and went the 30 miles to Kangaroo Island thru the Investigator Strait. For 8000 years, only birds made the crossing, so several unique island species evoled. What there is of the human population lives mostly on the Eastern side, where farms have operated since the 19th century, but nearly 30 % of the island is protected as Australian national Parkland. This stop we tendered to shore through six foot swells and walked into Penneshaw while a ferry was loading people and cars next to us.

Penneshaw is a refreshing little town where few people lock their doors or their cars. No fast food chains in town or anywhere on the island. Other noticeable absentees include, movie theaters, traffic lights and police, and there are a few paved roads, but lots of walking tracks.

We took a shuttle that had a stop at the top of a hill called lookout where we took a few shots of the fields and sea, Second stop was at Baudin Beach a small town where we visited the local art and craft gallery. Here we met Debbie and Pauline who not only cared for the shop, but also were nursing two baby kangaroos back to health after the mother was hit by a car. The baby was in the mothers pouch and they checked there before burring the mother. The other orphan was picked up by a passerby and brought to the women. Pauline was carrying the roo in a cotton pouch and she made Mary Ann hold the baby roo while we petted and scratched the animal. Afterwards we walked to the American Beach which is where American sealers and whalers processed their catches on the beach. The sailors would kidnap women from the mainland and bring them to the island for the use of the sailors. I don't know what happened to the women after the season was over. Back on the bus we drove to the nautical museum and learned about the ships that supplied the people who lived here and the people they took to this island including the young woman teachers. They had a law that a teacher could not marry and remain a teacher, so most of the girls married farmers, and of course they needed more teachers. We wanted to post mail from here but we forgot to bring it on the tender. Next stop was Frenchman’s Rock where Baudin came ashore for food and water after anchoring in Hog Bay in 1803. One of his men carved a message into a rock and now it is preserved at the Gateway Visitors Information Center. We then went back on the tender to the ship and rested before diner that evening, and everyone was there except John and Kathy who went on a long trip across the island to a wildlife preserve on the far Western side of the island.

That night Mary Ann woke me and said the bed was wet, I felt the very wet bed and stood on the bed and felt the wet ceiling around the sprinkler head. We put a blanket over the area and tried to go back to sleep, but I could now hear every drop hitting the bed and sprinkling us with the impact on the sheets. I called the front office and they sent someone to take us to another stateroom, where we spent the rest of the night, The next day we went back to our room and they had everything apart the beds tables and all moved so they could open up the ceiling and repair the leak. It was repaired by that afternoon only now the floor was wet so they had to dry the floor and we had to sleep in another stateroom another night while they dried the carpet. Well we hope all is back to normal, our next stop is Albany and we have never been there before.
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Comments

SANDY AND DON on

GOOD TO HEAR FROM YOU AGAIN SOUNDS LIKE YOU ARE HAVING A GREAT TIME. STAY DRY.
SANDY AND DON

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