Some days, the museums close early

Trip Start Jun 01, 2008
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Trip End Jun 30, 2008


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Wednesday, June 4, 2008

And Wednesday is one of the days the National Museum in Athens closes early. So, as it turns out, are Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.  And holidays.  In fact, Monday is the only day it stays open past 3pm.  But then it opens only at 1pm on Mondays.  It's good to know this before making the 45minute trip by tram and metro to see it and arriving at 3:20.  Fortunately, the outdoor cafe, O Kipos Mouseiou (The Museum Garden) stays open and it provides really good sandwiches and frappes (cold, Greek coffee).

Yesterday, we didn't have time to get to the Internet because we dragged ourselves out of bed around 8am in order to get to the top of the Acropolis before the midday heat and stayed out all day.  We saw the only choragic monument still in situ, the theatre of Dionysos, the Roman Odeion, the Propylaia, and, of course, the Parthenon.  I was amazed at how much of it they've managed to restore in the two years since I saw it last.  The columns on the north side are complete and they're placing the stones of the architrave now.  The care and precision with which they've inserted new marble into the ancient damaged columns is amazing and even moving.  The task is even more amazing when you consider that the workers and archaeologists have had to learn how to do the work even as they reconstructed it.  In any case, the first sight of this magnificent building takes the breath away. 

We also found our way into the Ancient Greek Agora and asociated museum--a quick visit because we arrived rather late (see a pattern here?).  Of course, we would have had more time if we hadn't stopped just across the road from the entrance to the Agora to cool ourselves with frappes.  And our trip was also made more exciting by the rare appearance of a bit of rain.  Meira and I ran through the shower to the Temple to Hephaistos and Athena.  She wanted to know the history behind the ancient religion, the arrival of Christians and, now, the revival of the ancient religion by both Greek nationals and others.  None of this was taught in her school.

The day was completed by much shopping in the Plaka, especially for souvenirs and shoes (I do have my daughters with me, after all).  After a fashionably late dinner in the Plaka, we made it home just before the tram shut down for the night.

Tonight will be an early night, though: the tour company picks us up at 6am for our high-speed ferry ride to Mykonos.  I hope the girls will get up in time!  But at least my cold is now disappearing, thanks to very strong Greek cold medicine.  I must bring some home with me!
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Comments

karenmw
karenmw on

The Parthenon
> I was amazed at how much of it they've managed to restore in the two years since I saw it last. The columns on the north side are complete and they're placing the stones of the architrave now. The care and precision with which they've inserted new marble into the ancient damaged columns is amazing and even moving.

How COOL!!! I can't wait to see it! Gee... that's in less than two weeks...

Love & peace,
Karen

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