National Parks

Trip Start Jul 25, 2012
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Trip End Ongoing


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Flag of Australia  , Western Australia,
Saturday, November 10, 2012

My stay at Fonty's Pool was wet, cold and miserable as the rain started pelting down again and turned the grounds into a quagmire.

On arrival the rain was but a light mist and as I drove into the grounds I could see there were chairs neatly lined up in front of a podium with the pool as a romantic backdrop and next to the reception office a huge white marquee being decorated feverishly for a weddding the next day.

As night drew closer, so did the clouds and then down it came. I was expecting drops on my head again from a leak that appeared days before in Nannup but I was leaning slightly down hill therefore I can only assume the rain was running away from the hole,crack or whatever it is up there...

Next morning it was still raining as I set off to One Tree Bridge.

Driving along and poof!

Windscreen wiper, (driver's side of course) jams against the right side and stays there, while the left hand side continues to sweep backwards and forwards, great! I had nowhere to stop as the road was very narrow, so I struggled on, straining my eyes trying to distinguish the road ahead. I finally found and opening and pulled over. I pulled the arm back into place and took off. Several kms down the road it happened again, and again for about 20kms, finally blue sky ahead at a little town called Carlotta. Whoooooo !

Time for the mechanic (that's ME) to get the adjustable spanner out and transfer the working wiper to the driver's side. The mechanism was working so I pulled the arms off changed them over and 'Bob's your uncle". Then it stopped raining. But at least I have a wiper on my side that works.

I was now doing another loop that was to take me to Pemberton via Beedelup Falls and Quinninup. I knew the falls were in a National Park, but hey! So is everything in W.A. I drove in and found myself heading down a hill towards a very large group and immediately thought...Oh! Oh! Maybe a Forest Ranger amongst them. I slammed on the breaks and did a quick reverse up the hill and parked the van some 100m away and preyed the dogs wouldn't see anyone go past and start barking and made me way down towards what was now an empty sight. The group had dispersed...and no Ranger anywhere. Oooof!
Brisk walk to the "FALLS"...more like a trickle compared to the Barron Falls in far north Qld.
Back to the van and on to:

Pemberton.
"The region was originally occupied by the Bibbulmun Australian Aborigines who knew the area as Wandergarup, which in their native tongue meant ‘plenty of water’.
The first settlers in the area, in 1862, were Edward Reveley
Brockman, who established Warren House homestead and station on the
banks of the Warren River,
and his uncle Pemberton Walcott, after whom the town would be named,
who established a farm and flour mill at Karri Dale, on the northern
outskirts of the later townsite.
In 1913, the newly-established, government-owned State Saw Mills
began construction on twin sawmills, No 2 and No 3, at the location,
then known as Big Brook, for the purpose of helping supply half a million railway sleepers for the Trans-Australian Railway.
The mill site was in a valley to ensure the mills had a regular supply
of water and because it was easier to roll logs down hill to the mills.
Big Brook became a thriving private mill town, with a hall, store, staff
accommodation, mill workers’ cottages, and single men’s huts, and two
boarding houses."


Pemberton c. 1919






 

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