Day Two - Chard to Bath

Trip Start Sep 09, 2012
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4
31
Trip End Nov 24, 2012


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Chard Museum, Chard, Somerset, England
Nunney Castle, Nunney, England

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Tuesday, September 11, 2012

In the morning we visited the Chard council chambers and the Chard museum. Chard was a town famous for it's lace making. This wasn't lace like doilies but it seemed more like scrim, made on huge looms. At times it was prosperous and others the work was not there. It created tensions and there was a "Lace Riot", as workers wages and conditions eroded. In some of the local history books, Henry Howell was recorded as a road contractor.I wish I had more time here, I would have done some more family tree research. I think I'll have to journey back to England etc in the future and focus on the family tree next time!
 
Upon leaving Chard, we headed to Nunney Castle Built in the 1370’s, it is a cute castle and even cuter town. The castle is right in the town centre, and surrounded by a moat.

Next stop, Farleigh Hungerford Castle : Home of a very colourful family it was built in the 1300’s. We could imagine how grandiose it would have been.  Even in those days the council fined the owner for building a fortifying wall without permission.

The stories from this castle included;

-       Lady Agnes Hungerford, who upon the previous death of the first Lady Hungerford sought to marry Lord Hungerford. She was however married at the time and so conspired with two other castle residents to murder her first husband. He was burned in the castle kitchen ovens and she succeed in marrying Lord Hungerford however, upon his death, she was charged with her co-conspirators for the death of her first husband and all were executed!

-       Lord Hungerford’s son also kept his wife prisoner in one of the towers for years and servants loved her dearly and used to sneak food up into the tower for her.

-       In the 1800’s, tourists would visit the castle and were fascinated by the crypt which housed a number of Hungerford’s encased in lead coffins. Around this time, a hole formed in one of these coffins and smells wafting from the hole were said to be putrid. Then one day someone decided it would be a good idea to insert sticks into this hole which they would withdraw and lick the sticks to taste the embalming fluid and all other fluids contributing to the goo! GROSS!!!!

We then journeyed onto Bath. We loved Bath but like Jane Austen, I don’t think we’d like to live there. After checking in and dumping our bags at the Carfax Hotel, we hot footed it down Great Pulteney Street to Bath Abbey. We spent some time wandering through and admiring the amazing stained glass windows and architectural details and reading the memorials on the floors and walls. There seemed to be a habit back in the day of exchanging s’s for f’s so discharge became difcharge, several became feveral and Dr John Marten Butt in 1769 was recorded as being a 'friendly, popular and fuccefsfull Phyfician’.

We then headed next door into the Roman Baths. It is amazing to think how long this place has been around and how long it remained undiscovered! The main pool had a lead liner that after thousands of years continues to remain impervious! We absorbed the atmosphere and made a wish in the cold plunge pool then headed back to our accommodation.

At the front of our hotel, I somehow managed to drop my iPhone and smash the LCD. Thankfully, I could still read it and immediately googled Apple stores in Bath and plotted out our course for the next morning. I also managed to down a cup of ta, ok it was raspberry but still I can now say I had tea in England :P   
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Comments

Kylie on

So a trip back planned already....

Did you try drinking some of the Roman Baths water?

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