On to Roatan

Trip Start Dec 13, 2006
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28
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Trip End Jan 31, 2011


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Flag of Honduras  , Islas de la Bahía,
Sunday, May 23, 2010

Moved to Texan Bay Marina to stage for our next trip to Honduras.  Mike wanted a last taste of that chicken fried steak.  As it turned out, as our meal was served, a humongous downpour occurred, and although we are ordinarily religious about closing hatches when we leave the boat, of course, we had not. Mike and I sprinted to our boat where we furiously tried to get the windows closed—bedrooms first, then the main salon.  Of course, it was raining so hard that we could not avert a soaked bed; Steve insisted his was not bad, but Mike and I had to spend the night in the salon.  Anyhow, back to dinner...the power was out, so we ate in the dark.  My bony grilled whole fish was a little tough to manage with very little light.  We sat around with Sherrie, the owner, waiting for the rain to subside; Steve helped the staff tie up boats.  However, the rain did not subside...So Mike and I finally made a dash for it getting totally drenched.  In the morning, the sun was out and we tried to dry out as much as we could before getting on to Livingston to check out.  

Despite notifying the customs agent Raul ahead of time about our departure, we still had to wait over an hour in his stultifying hot office to obtain our clearance papers as the power was out in Livingston too.  After getting the sacred Zarpe, we moved about  2 hours further to Cabo Tres Puntas, the tip of a peninsula near the mouth of the Rio Dulce.  We were the only boat amidst some local fisherman.  It was good to get back into salt water.  Early the next morning—7 a.m.--we set out for Roatan, Honduras.  We motored as there was no wind arriving at 11 a.m. On Thursday, May 19th.  We anchored in Coxen Hole, a small town on the south side.  Although we tried to get information from the Port Captain before going into town, he did not return our call as he said.  So we went in search of him, first having a great lunch of cheeseburger, fishburger and Honduran sausage at Nardo Bar and Grill where we were able to tie our dinghy.  
After lunch, we found immigration and then the Port Captain who proceeded to chide us for our lack Spanish.  Now Mike, in fact, does speak pretty good Spanish, but somehow this fellow had a lot of fun at our expense.  Bottom line, we finally got checked in.
The next morning we proceeded to French Harbor, a beautiful spot, where several other cruisers anchored as well.  Had a difficult time anchoring and finally learned, thanks to David Lee and Terrie aboard the catamaran, Expectations, that the mooring balls sprinkled around were free.  That saved the day as it was horribly hot in the bright, warm sun and after three tries in very thin sand, we were all beat.  Of course, as we neared French Harbor, our newly purchased port engine went out!  Mike is still trying to figure out the problem, but thank goodness for two engines.  In the meantime, we're enjoying the crystal clear, cool water and breezy conditions.  Quite a change from the Rio!  
We're especially glad we found out about the moorings.  A boat nearby broke loose from its anchor today while its owners were elsewhere.  Steve and Mike went to the rescue with some other neighbors.  In the midst of trying to drag Gusto off the reef, her owners, a family of six, arrived.  With everyone's help they were safely hooked up to a mooring.
And, we were thrilled when a local fisherman came to our boat with fresh lobster and red snapper to sell.  We made a deal for 500 lempira (about $20) plus three gallons of gas and he filleted the fish and prepared the lobster for us.  A yummy dinner awaits.
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