Caprivi Strip and Angola in sight

Trip Start Dec 16, 2005
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Trip End Jun 12, 2006


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Friday, April 28, 2006

Stuck in Maun for the day and everyone was bored to tears. We seemed to spend most of the day on the truck and did a trip into town.

I was working on the hangover by drinking fruit juice and beer and was also indulging on some tasty curried beef and peppered steak pies from the local Shoprite supermarket.

I took Kate to the hospital. Things were looking pretty serious and there was now a whole load of bruising to go with the swelling. They wanted to keep her in the hospital overnight, but in the end she made do with some strong antibiotics and some cleaning solution.

Patrick gave one of his boring speeches again that evening. Poor Byron was fast asleep in Jackie's arms by the end of it. He does actually have some interesting information, he just lacks a bit on the delivery. 'Sour Sour' or something along those lines was another one of his Swahili catch-phrases he slipped in all the time where we may have said OK. The other big phrase was 'are we together?' that he muttered to us every other phrase.

My thoughts on Botswana include, and I know I'm always saying this but it was fantastic and again because of the diversity. We ended up doing activities and seeing sights here that were totally different to anything I'd seen in the other countries.

The trip on the Mokoros, the scenic flight were all superb. On the down side of things we were moving into a western culture and I had the feeling I wouldn't be experiencing the sorts of things that happened in east Africa anymore.

Next day and it was back on the big green monster for the trip to Namibia. Patrick, our glorious leader, was up late, he'd been on the booze the previous evening and had closed the bar so we did end up leaving a little late.


We drove up the western side of the Okovango Delta. All very dry and bushy with plenty of acacia trees. Like everywhere else in Botswana there seemed to be cattle and donkeys all over the road and taking shade under the acacia trees. We also passed by fields of sorghum on the long road that seemed to stretch out for ever into the distance.

The border crossing into Namibia was a piece of cake. This overland truck business seems a bit easy after what had happened in east Africa.

Once in Namibia we continued in our nice comfortable truck, sprawled out over 4 seats each, a bottle of beer in hand and the Ipod blaring.

The area we entered Namibia in was called the Caprivi Strip. A thin piece of land that intersects Botswana and Angola and connects Namibia to Zambia and Zimbabwe.

We arrived in Rundu, did some shopping and got to our camp site around 6:30. From the campsite on the Okavango River we could see Angola, 20m across the water. N'Kwawi Lodge was the name of the camp. Lovely place and location.

Had a nice evening and met some more overlanders on a reverse tour to ours with Nomad. Unfortunately they said there was not too much to see in Etosha NP, our next stop.

Etosha is famous for the water holes where all the animals congregate in the dry season. It seemed like there had been more rain than usual this year, making the wildlife difficult to spot.

One South African guy at this campsite moaned about our truck, in much the same way I would have done if I saw an overland truck a few months earlier. This guy asked up directly what time we would be getting up in the morning. I really wanted to say 4am, but refrained myself. He also instructed us not to walk through his campsite on the way to the toilets and told us exactly which route he believed we should take to get there, which was well away from his tent! That evening Liam also overheard a rather posh British lady saying 'oh no the overlanders have arrived'. As I said a few months earlier I would have been the same, now I was one of them!
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Where I stayed
N'Kwawi lodge

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