Bigodi Wetland - Monkeys birds and a home stay

Trip Start Dec 16, 2005
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Trip End Jun 12, 2006


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Flag of Uganda  ,
Tuesday, January 24, 2006

Breakfast was included in the hotel price, I wasn't expecting too much but it turned into a feast. Coffee, fresh juice (tasted a bit like a mix between papaya and orange), bread fruit and a Spanish omelet, well that's what they said, I always though a Spanish omelet was with potatoes, but this one was with onions, tomatoes and peppers. Any ideas anyone?















After a quick visit to one of the local mosques that was particularly pretty I headed off for Bigodi wetlands. Good views of the snow capped Rwenzori mountains along the way. My accommodation was a home stay with a Ugandan family of 8, who I did everything with such as meals etc. this made for a good authentic Ugandan experience. The wetlands were famous for primates and birds. We went for an early evening walk and spotted a whole bunch of Red Colobus, Black and White Colobus, Red Tails, Vervets and L'hostes in the primate category. Ok now for a list of some of the birds for anyone who's interested - Great Blue Turacos, Black and White Hornbills, Yellow Backed Weavers, Wagtails, Cookoos, Woodland Kingfishers (a beautiful blue colour), Flycatchers, Mannikins..... Oh and almost forgot we saw a big green mamba slink away from the edge of the trail and some cool looking red flowers belonging to Fire Lilleys and Fire trees.

The kids had a good laugh at me later that evening as I had my first experience of Jackfruit. Very tasty indeed, but a bit fiddly to get the actual fruit part out. As with lunch my dinner was so huge I only ate about half of it, I felt guilty but I really couldn't eat anymore, and I believe it's good to leave at least some to show that your host they provided you with enough! On the menu we had, pork, kale, cabbage in a peanut sauce, sweet potatoes, matoke (plantains), cassava (a white root vegie) and posho (maize flour based I believe). All the food was steamed in banana leaves over a stove.

Once the food was done the young kids spent the evening telling fables that the older kids translated to English for me.

The house I was in was very environmentally friendly, solar power on the roof, water drained off the roof into some large water containers, this would satisfy most of the families water needs. They grew all their own food in a number of plots they had around the village.
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Comments

jonclark2000
jonclark2000 on

heading off hiking
Hope you're all well - heading off to the Rwenzoris tomorrow for a 7 day hike!

Keep the e-mails coming, it's great to hear all your news.

Tinka on

informing the writer thast your Ugandan host is now in Nagoya for COP10. Is it possible to meet?

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