From Rome to Pompei and Positano

Trip Start Jun 03, 2011
1
5
11
Trip End Jun 18, 2011


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Where I stayed

Flag of Italy  , Campania,
Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Well, that was an interesting morning. First, our wake-up call never happened.  Luckily George woke up at 8 (an hour after our wake-up call) so we just showered and packed like mad, instead of having  our planned leisurely breakfast.  Then we go downstairs to check out and call a cab to Termini Station, the train station where we are supposed to go to Napoli en route to Pompeii and Positano.  Well, all the taxi drivers are on strike as of this morning.  Hmm.  Luckily, we are only a 15 minute walk! So, luggage in tow, cobblestone streets, 15 minutes.  Get to the train station: one sign says the train is leaving five minutes early.  The other saying it is leaving an hour late.  And no information for WHERE our train shall be.  Alas! The number appears, we make our train and it is on time! Victory is ours!


After arriving in Napoli, our day gets much better.  Napoli seems to be a very VERY dirty city, the dirtiest I've ever seen.  There were piles of trash in the street taller than me. We are picked up by a taxi driver from the hotel, much nicer and less insane than our driver into Rome. He first takes us by Pompei, pointing out many sights along the way.  We stop in Pompei for two hours with a little audio guide.  If ever you get the change to go to Pompeii, I recommend paying the extra 4 Euro for a real guide, the audio guide was rather disorganized and you never knew exactly where you were.  It didn’t help that the signs for what code to enter were about the size of a large pencil and the same color as everything else.  So we just made up what we decided each place was, occasionally forcing the audio guide to work with us.  But even with that, Pompeii is incredible.  It’s amazing what was preserved, you can even see some of the paintings on the walls.  Lots of it was closed off due to renovations, but even with that we didn’t get the chance to see everything in two hours. The streets are canals with little stone bridges.  There are many restaurants and more than one amphitheater. And randomly, there are dogs everywhere. It's incredible.

After Pompei, we begin our drive to Positano.  It's a lovely, if terrifying drive.  The entire time we are on winding roads on cliff sides.  We pass through Sorrento and on to the Amalfi Coast. It's truly breathtaking.  It is the most beautiful city I have ever seen.  And my, we have a room with a view! The again, I don't think it's possible to have a room without a view in this town... It's very different from Rome.  The people are incredibly polite, which is fabulous.  Sitting on the balcony in our room I can hear the piano bar a ways below us.  The buildings here are built into a cliff face, one almost on top of another.  And anything lemon you could ask for is amazing.  It's their specialty here.  Rome seems to have amazing gelato, Positano has amazing lemons.  They are also famous for making custom sandals, but I have not experienced that yet.   If Pompei has a lot of wild dogs, Positano seems to have a lot of wild cats.  They are everywhere and couldn't care less about the people.  We had both a cat and a dog wander into the restaurant at dinner and sit right next to our table, begging for scraps.  The funniest part was that no one really cared, it was kind of cute. 


Tomorrow, Positano shall be explored, there shall be lemony goodness and a fabulous day with a view!
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Comments

Phaedra on

Ah, Naples, known as "the Armpit of Italy" for good reason. And I totally agree--driving along the Amalfi coast is SCARY!!!

Mom on

Need more pics of you and George

jmsges
jmsges on

I know, it's hard to get pictures of us together! That requires giving my camera to someone else and trusting them with it...

Rhiannon on

Holy smokes that's a beautiful view!!
Lemons. Duly noted.

The Pompei dogs always make me sad.

I translated a section of Pliny the Younger for a class in which he described first hand what the eruption was like. (His uncle led a rescue fleet that sailed over and tried to rescue the people in the effected towns.) Kind of made it more real.

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