Mandatory Monuments in Washington DC

Trip Start Oct 31, 2008
1
4
Trip End Nov 03, 2008


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Flag of United States  , District of Columbia
Saturday, November 1, 2008

The parking in Washington DC sucked .  .  so you spent more time looking for a place to park
than visiting anywhere. That is why the tour buses that went to all the monuments were so popular but they only stopped for 15 minutes a location . . . and were pretty expensive.

If you spent any time at all in Washington you could get real good at taking cool photos at night. We were not there long enough for me to learn my camera and I did not bring the instruction manual. So these are the best I could do.

The list of mandatory monuments is set in stone . . .. and then there are couple dozen extra . . .

These were my favorites.

THE CAPITOL BIULDING

Every day that we were there the "Mall" a one block wide strip of park that runs from in front of the Capital Building all the way through to the Washington Monument, then continuing through to the the WWII Monument where the Reflection Pool starts and goes on to the Lincoln Monument with parks and monuments on both sides, was full of Activities. On Saturday there was a "March" which sounded more impressive than it actually was. Two blocks up, one over, Two back and your done. Not even sure what it was all about. All it did was make parking a nightmare.

 













THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT

 













Washington Monument is easily viewed from pretty much anywhere in Washington DC.















Weighing 90,854 tons, the Washington Monument stands 555' 5-1/8" tall. The walls of the monument range in thickness from 15' at the base to 18'' at the upper shaft. They are composed of white marble from Maryland and Massachusetts, underlain by granite, the whole supported by interior ironwork. A slight color change is perceptible at the 152' -level. A flight of 897 steps rises to the observation area in the pyramidion. Inserted into the interior walls are 192 carved stones presented by individuals, societies, cities, States, and nations of the world. An elevator takes visitors to the top, where they can gaze over the city from the monument's windows.

THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL

 











The Lincoln Memorial is at the west end of the National Mall a monument to the 16th President.

The Washington Historical Society states that, The memorial, designed by Henry Bacon, after ancient Greek temples, stands 190 feet long, 119 feet wide, and almost 100 feet high. It is surrounded by a peristyle of 38 fluted Doric columns, one for each of the thirty six states in the Union at the time of Lincoln's death. The north and south side chambers contain carved inscriptions of Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address and his Gettysburg Address. Lying between the north and south chambers is the central hall containing the solitary figure of Lincoln sitting in contemplation. The statue was carved in four years by the Piccirilli brothers under the supervision of the sculptor, Daniel Chester French. The statue of Lincoln is 19 feet high and weighs 175 tons. The original plan was for the statue to be only ten feet high, but this was changed so that the figure of Lincoln would not be dwarfed by the size of the chamber.

  











 














JEFFERSON MEMORIAL

 














The Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC is a dome-shaped rotunda that honor's our third president, Thomas Jefferson. The memorial is one of the most impressive sites in Washington, DC. A 19-foot bronze statue of Jefferson is surrounded by passages from the Declaration of Independence and Jefferson's other writings.



World War II Memorial

   











 















Here you can see the Lincoln Memorial in the background behind the WWII Memorial.
















THE VIETNAM MEMORIAL












The parks were full of little critters and birds.

 
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