A Line Runs Through It

Trip Start May 30, 2005
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Trip End Sep 30, 2006


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Monday, May 8, 2006

It was a 10 hour journey to Nazca, fairly short! I was delighted when we reached the coast and I saw the ocean for the first time in about 5 months, it was also a relief to finally leave the altitude of the Altiplano, it was interesting but I really was gettting fed up of the height, cold and thin air. Sea Level is much more my scene I think. We managed to get a flat tyre on the bus, which wasn't such a problem as it meant that we could get off the bus for the hour that it took to change. The bad news was that we now had to catch up some time. I then spent the next 5 hours in my bus seat, not getting off the bus at any point as the stops were short and just long enough for the passengers to get on and off. I was so glad to finally leave the bus when we arrived in Nazca.

I quickly found a hostel and wasn't too bothered since I'd just be spending the one night there. My hostel certainally fufilled the criteria of cheap and chearful.

I went to catch a bus to the Nazca lines in the morning and was told it'd be half an hour before the bus left. As is usual around here, there were 2 or 3 touts hanging around trying to get as many people on this bus as they could. The bus also appeared to be possesed as it kept rolling backwards and forwards, as if it couldn't wait to get on the open road! Everytime it looked like the bus would finally leave I'd make a motion as if to get on the bus and one of the touts would look at his watch and say something like "10 Minutes more!", what a crazy system!

Bang on the designated time, the chains from the bus were finally removed and it belted along the road towards the Nazca lines and destinations beyond that. I was dropped off and climbed a tower to get a better view. The drawings that I saw were fairly small, they were "The Tree" and "The Bird". I took a couple of piccies and chatted to the local that'd followed me up the tower.

He was a really nice guy, who's English was brilliant. He was really curious about everything to do with Scotland, especially Kilts! Or I should really say, he wanted to know what we wore underneath the kilt. He was pretty perplexed by the whole affair!

Further back along the road there was a little hill where you could see some more lines, they didn't form any pictures however. The 'guard' at this hill told me to stay on the path and not to walk on the desert itself, fair enough, you wouldn't want lots of tourists walking all over your drawings. The vantage from this little hill wasn't great so I decided to climb up the path on the bigger hill on the other side of the road.

As I got to the top I looked out over the desert and saw more lines, which is why I stopped here I guess. I then heard the 'guard' shouting and whistling at me, I looked at him and he was waving me down. I'd seen enough anyway so I headed down to the road.
"You're not allowed to go up there"
"But there was a path!"
"Yes, that's an old path, you're not allowed up there anymore"
"But it's not on the desert and there are no signs forbidding you to climb the hill"
"Yes, but you're not allowed up there"

I just left it at that, I'd seen what I wanted to see anyway. I got the bus back to town and considered getting one of the flights over the lines to see them better. It wasn't the 50 Dollar charge that put me off, rather it was the time that it'd have taken. I was ready to leave town and was happy to do that. In all truth I'd been warned that the Nazca lines aren't really a great tourist attraction and I only decided to see them since I was passing through anyway, I wouldn't have gone out of my way to see them, and I'd suggest the same to anyone else.

Back in Nazca I packed my bags, gathered my hat I'd laid down the night before and caught the next bus to Pisco.
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