Kennedy Space Center

Trip Start Dec 05, 2012
1
15
88
Trip End Dec 31, 2014


Loading Map
Map your own trip!
Map Options
Show trip route
Hide lines
shadow

Flag of United States  , Florida
Saturday, January 26, 2013

Our next stop was The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The race to the moon is not history to me. I can remember cutting out newspaper clipping of all the different missions on our way to the moon. Right now, I am thinking about that July day when we all watched on our black & white TV's (I know hard to believe it no color HD) to see what was one of the greatest achevements in the history of the human race.

History & Facts
KSC has been used by the United States as the launch site for every NASA human space flight since 1968. Although such flights are currently on hiatus, KSC continues to manage and operate unmanned rocket launch facilities for the US government's civilian space program from three pads at the adjoining Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Its Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) (see the pictures below) is the fourth-largest structure in the world by volume and was the largest when completed in 1965. Located on Merritt Island, Florida, the center is north-northwest of Cape Canaveral on the Atlantic Ocean. It is 34 miles (55 km) long and roughly 6 miles (10 km) wide, covering 219 square miles (570 km2). At the hight of the space race over 500,000 people worked here now about 13,100 people worked at the center as of 2011.

Since December 1968, all launch operations have been conducted from Pads A and B at Launch Complex 39 (LC-39). We drove past both pads, which you can see the pictures of them below. Both pads are on the ocean, 3 miles (5 km) east of the VAB. From 1969–1972, LC-39 was the departure point for all six Apollo manned Moon landing missions using the Saturn V, the largest and most powerful operational launch vehicle in history (the pictures show one which was on display), and was used from 1981–2011 for all Space Shuttle launches. The Shuttle Landing Facility, located just to the north, was used for most Shuttle landings and is among the longest runways in the world.

A total of twelve men have landed on the Moon. This was accomplished with two US pilot-astronauts flying a Lunar Module on each of six missions across a 41-month time span starting on 20 July 1969 UTC, with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on Apollo 11, and ending on 14 December 1972 UTC with Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt on Apollo 17. Cernan was the last to step off the lunar surface.

It was a great stop which made me wish that we had continued at the same pace we were at back in the late 1960's, by this time we would have people living on Mars!
Slideshow Report as Spam

Use this image in your site

Copy and paste this html: