A city of Marble

Trip Start Jan 28, 2012
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Trip End Jan 28, 2013


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Flag of Turkey  , Turkish Aegean Coast,
Saturday, April 21, 2012

An overnight bus journey from Istanbul bought us to the small town of Selcuk, a place where we could explore one of the best preserved Greek/Roman Ruins on the Mediterranean at Ephesus and also visit the House of Virgin Mary.

Firstly a Greek city, and then later a major Roman city, Ephesus had a population of more than 250,000 in the 1st century BC. The city was famed for the Temple of Artemis (completed around 550 BC), one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The city's importance as a commercial center declined as the harbor was slowly silted up by the Cayster River. Ephesus was one of the seven churches of Asia that are cited in the Book of Revelation. The Gospel of John may have been written here. The city is also the site of a large gladiators' graveyard.
 
The House of the Virgin Mary is a Roman Catholic and Muslim shrine located on Mt. Koressos near Ephesus. The house was discovered in the 19th century by following the descriptions in the reported visions of Anne Catherine Emmerich (1774–1824), a Roman Catholic nun and visionary, which were published as a book by Clemens Brentano after her death.The Roman Catholic Church has never pronounced on the authenticity of the house, for lack of acceptable evidence. It has, however, from the blessing of the first pilgrimage by Pope Leo XIII in 1896, taken a positive attitude towards the site and towards Emmerich's visions. Anne Catherine Emmerich was Beatified by Pope John Paul II on October 3, 2004. Pilgrims visit the house based on the belief that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was taken to this stone house by Saint John and lived there until her death.


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