Antarctica Day2 - Drake's Passage

Trip Start Jul 08, 2007
1
57
143
Trip End Ongoing


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Flag of Antarctica  ,
Friday, February 22, 2008

O mighty Drake's passage, all of last night you kept us awake, but know that tomorrow we shall be beyond your reach. 
 
All night, all day, the waves of the Drake's passage shook the boat to reach at its worst 40o on each side.  Later in the day however, we got smaller waves and so overall, we can be pleased with our crossing.  Most of what could fall on the floor did and from my bed, I appreciated the tangle of the ocean, back and forth continuously for hours and hours, as if the ocean was taking me in its arms and with its love, rocking me endlessly.  If I have appreciated this portion so far, I cannot say it has been the same for most of the passengers.  More than half remained in their bed most of the day, as laying flat helps with sea sickness.  If I avoided sea sickness myself, I did attract the products of others however.  During a lecture on the origins of the Antarctic continent with our on board geologist, I have been vomited on by a Japanese woman.  A few minutes after, a Japanese man, who was trying to get to a seat behind me, miscalculated his angle (keep in mind that the boat was rocking quite a bit) and ended up on me.  Pretty much everybody at the lecture saw what happened and it quickly became a subject of laughter and conversation.  Something funny always help to break the iceJ .
 
Day 2 is typically a day of travel, lectures and slowly preparing our arrival to Antarctica.  We have started to see magnificent birds, such as Albatrosses.  The Albatross is the widest bird in the world with more than 3.5 meters wide wing to wing.  We have been introduced to the types of whales we are likely to see, history of the heroic attempts of explorers to reach Antarctica as well as an overview of the geology of the white continent.
 
I feel completely disconnected from reality and the dream of reaching Antarctica.  It is more and more difficult to ground myself and know who I have become.  I only have my endless smile to keep me company and the realization that I have no control whatsoever over my life.  Every moment passing by is a token of my commitment of letting go and simply accepting a destiny, wherever life has decided to take me...
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