A Long Day

Trip Start Apr 29, 2011
1
21
109
Trip End Sep 03, 2011


Loading Map
Map your own trip!
Map Options
Show trip route
Hide lines
shadow

Flag of Poland  , Baltic Coast,
Friday, June 3, 2011

It was an early start. We had the engine on at 04:15, it was light enough to see by but we still needed the boat's steering lights on for safety’s sake. There was virtually no breeze so we resigned ourselves to a long day under engine, unless things improved.

The air was chill but the sky was perfectly clear and blue. What wind there was was blowing from the NW so the cockpit was quite sheltered and indeed, by lunch time, it became quite hot and sunbathing whilst on watch (one hour on, one hour off) was the order of the day.


The passage to Łeba (pronounced Webb-ah) is made longer and more complex due to the presence of two significant rectangles stretching out from the coast and eleven miles out to sea, restricted areas for the testing of military ordnance. They were certainly testing, as from late morning, loud booms could be heard from shore but disappointingly, we never spotted any waterspouts where the shells landed. Perhaps that’s a good thing!

We spotted a high speed vessel of some description as we approached the seaward corner of the first rectangle but she disappeared out to sea at the rate of knots. Interestingly, downwind (westward) of us, just by the corner of the restricted area and in a chain spreading westwards, were many fishing boats of all sizes manned by earnest anglers. I think that they were trying to catch cod, as they had large lures and were rhythmically raising and lowering their rods, making the lures jig about 30m below the surface.

Once past the restricted area, we were able to turn through 30 or so and head in a shallow tangent towards Łeba, 27 miles away. Gradually, the coast became more defined and we were able to discern that which makes this part of Poland famous and unique, huge areas of sand dunes that constitute the Slowinsky National Park, 44,500 acres of them and sufficiently important to be on UNESCO’s list of World Biosphere Reserves. We hoped to see more of these tomorrow.

Again, the entrance to this particular harbour is untenable in most wind directions when it is blowing hard. This is exacerbated by a current of up to two knots across the mouth of the entrance in adverse conditions and moreover, it is subject to silting so steep waves can quickly build up as they approach the shelving shore. Happily, we had none of these problems to contend with as it was as flat as a fluke and there was even a dredger at work in the mouth of the harbour, so we had lots of water!

We were soon safely tied up in the pleasant marina, with the engine off at 18:45, having worked flawlessly for 14.5 hours and with 86 miles covered. Tired, slightly sunburnt (me) and pleased to be safe in a working marina, we enjoyed a meal of moussaka (cooked en route) and a bottle of retsina. Lovely jubbly.
Slideshow Report as Spam

Use this image in your site

Copy and paste this html: