Rosemary's departure

Trip Start Apr 09, 2010
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82
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Trip End Sep 26, 2010


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Flag of Denmark  , Capital Region,
Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Today we were losing one of our friends, as Rosemary's flight for Stansted left at 17:10. Elaine’s plane to Manchester was leaving the next day at 16:30. That meant that we had two good half days to fill and we were determined to do so well, to avoid that 'last day of the holiday hanging around for a plane’ feeling. As it was Rosemary’s last day she had the choice of what to do and she opted for a visit to Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek which is a museum and art gallery originally formed from the art collection of the Carlsberg brewing magnate Carl Jacobsen, who’d donated the whole lot to the state. So at the crack of 11:00, Rosemary had finished her packing and we’d deposited her case in the airport’s left luggage which left us unencumbered to go and be cultural again.

The museum has a strange mixture of collections but all of them extensive, including Egyptian, Roman, Greek and Etruscan sculptures, pottery and a wide range of artefacts, as well as our reason for attending, floors devoted to French art and sculpture. As an example, the museum is second only to France for its collection of Rodin’s work and it had 30 of Gaugin’s contributions to the art world – more in a moment.

The moment is now. I was aware that Gaugin had been a prolific painter, doing far more than that which perhaps he is most famous for, the paintings from Tahiti. What I didn’t know until this visit was that he was a consummate sculptor and potter, some of his clay sculptured pots were superb. Moreover, he was also a decent ‘whittler’ in that his wood carvings were fabulous (see picture). As well as Gaugin, there were works by Monet, Manet, Delacroix and Corot to name but a few. Post impressionists were represented by artists such as Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh and Pisarro. Finally, the huge collection of Rodins’ included a version of the ‘Burghers of Calais’ and ‘The Kiss’.  In short, a superb collection and well worth the 60 Kroner each to see.

We had a superb lunch of smoked salmon and salad and all too soon, it was time to catch the metro back to Kastrup for the three of us and the airport, one stop further, for Rosemary.  It’s a good way to say goodbye, no time for long drawn out farewells as the metro only allows 20 seconds at each stop, so we’d done it and were off before you could blink. Our last view of Rosemary was a typical one, one of her smiling. She is always ready to laugh, it’s one of her endearing features and the boat will be all the quieter with her departure.

Enough of that, we had work to do! A quick call in at the supermarket for supplies then back to the boat, me via the chandlers to pick up the replacement bowthruster switch and after a quick refreshing drink, it was down to work for yours truly. My fingers and toes were crossed when I connected the new switch to the 6 way plug that provided power and I was almost praying when I turned on the power and – it worked! Phew, I was very, very relieved as I honestly didn’t know what to do next if it wasn’t the solution.  Having uncrossed my fingers, it wasn’t too much of a job to remove the malfunctioning switch and replace it with the new one, which was a good thing as we were hailed by David Sargeaunt of David and Likengkeng Sargeaunt (Aquaholic) who we’d met briefly 2 weeks ago and who had flown home for the fortnight that we were a foursome. The Sargeaunt’s wanted to return the compliment and asked us round to Aquaholic for aperitifs, which we did with alacrity and very pleasant it was too.

Then back on board to a Delia meal of Tart Spaghetti (tuna, olives, capers, tomatoes, onions, garlic & pasta) which was Elaine’s request and then, sated, we retired to bed.





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