Origin of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Trip Start Jan 01, 2014
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Trip End Dec 31, 2014


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Where I stayed
MS Marina
What I did
Archaeological site of Qumran

Flag of Palestinian Territory  , West Bank,
Friday, October 26, 2012

Map of Qumran
 
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OCT 26: Qumran became famous from a sect known as the Essenes who lived and studied here for two centuries through the revolt of the Jews against the Romans, and left in the surrounding caves we now call the Dead Sea Scrolls. They arrived in Qumran at the end of the second century BCE, but abandoned the site in 31 BCE after a serious earthquake. A quarter century later, they returned to Qumran and rebuilt it, but in 68 BCE, the Romans conquered Qumran and disbursed the sect. A Roman garrison was established there for a few years, but was abandoned and forgotten until 1947 when Bedouin shepherds found seven scrolls in a local cave. The scrolls were hidden in jars in the caves that dot the difficult to reach slopes as their hiding places, and preserved for some two thousand years as a result of their dry climate. The Essenes practiced cleansiness and purity, and their settlements were constructed to make them self-reliant with assembly halls, dining room, ritual baths, laundry room, a watch tower, a pottery workshop, and a stable.


In 1967, the National Parks Authority built an access road and parking lot, paths for hikers, information signs, and installed sanitary facilities. 

I walked 5.4 miles today.


You can view the digital Dead Sea Scrolls with some explanations here;
http://dss.collections.imj.org.il/

NOTE: The Dead Sea is 1,312 feet below sea level.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 

 
  

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