From Ephesus to Santorini, Part II

Trip Start Jan 01, 2014
1
206
417
Trip End Dec 31, 2014


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Where I stayed
M//v /Arethusa - a 50-passenger boat

Flag of Turkey  , Turkish Aegean Coast,
Thursday, July 1, 2010



Ephesus & Kusadasi; July 1, 2010, Thursday:

Our coach ride from Izmir airport towards Ephesus

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Our lunch stop and visit to carpet cooperative




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Our guide at Ephesus

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Ephesus entrance



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History of Ephesus (Samsung)

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St John's Basilica:


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Today was a very busy day; we took a flight from Istanbul to Izmir, then coached 60 miles to Ephesus, with a stop for lunch on our way, and to a government run carpet cooperative, After our visits to Ephesus, we continued our our of the Basilica of St John, the site of the Temple of Artemis (one of the Seven Wonders of the World), then to the Aegean resort of Kusadasi to board our ship, the M/V Arethusa. According to
mythology, Arethusa is a nereid nymph who became a fountain.



Ephesus is the best preserved Greco-Roman city in Asia which dates back to 1,300 BC. It was once the second largest city in the world with a population up to 300,000, and ranked just behind Rome.



From Wiki:

The history of archaeological research in Ephesus stretches back to 1863, when British architect John Turtle Wood, sponsored by the British Museum, began to search for the Artemision.  In 1869 he discovered the pavement of the temple, but since further
expected discoveries were not made the excavations stopped in 1874. In 1895 German archaeologist
Otto Benndorf, financed by a 10,000 guilder donation made by Austrian Karl Mautner Ritter von Markhof, resumed excavations. In 1898 Benndorf founded the Austrian
Archaeological Institute
which plays a leading role in Ephesus today.


Ephesus contains the largest collection of Roman ruins in the eastern Mediterranean. Only an estimated 15% has been excavated. The ruins that are visible give some idea of the city's original splendor, and the names associated with the ruins are evocative of its former life.  The theater dominates the view down Harbour Street, which leads to the silted-up harbor.   The Library of Celsus, the fašade of which has been carefully reconstructed from all original pieces, was built ca. 125 AD by Gaius Julius Aquila in memory of his father and once held nearly 12,000 scrolls. Designed with an exaggerated entrance — so as to enhance its perceived size, speculate many historians — the building faces east so that the reading rooms could make best use of the morning light.



Ephesus is one of the largest archaeological sites in the world. It was an ancient Greek city before it became a major Roman city. Early records show this area was inhabited about 6,000 BC, but recent excavations have unearthed settlements from the early Bronze Age.


Ephesus was founded by an Attic-Ionian colony in the 10th century BC, and the mythical founder was a prince of Athens named Androkles.  According to legend, the place was founded based on the oracle of Delphi (A fish and boar will show you the way.)

Ephesus was once a port city, but silt from the river filled in the coast, and is now land-locked.

I walked 9,859 steps today which calculates out to be about 2.6 miles.






Island of Patmos; July 2, 2010, Friday:

Patmos harbor

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Monastery



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Gia su” is hello or goodbye, and “kalimera” is good morning.  We spent six hours on this island of 2,500 people which is rocky, rugged, and barren of vegetation, but popular with cruise ships and pilgrimage. According to Roman legend, the island received its name when Poseidon stepped on it; “patima” being step in Greek. St John
spent two years on Patmos where he wrote the book of Revelation.   Our visit to the UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Holy Cave of the Apocalypse, and the Monastery of St John was the highlight of our visit.




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Chora




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I walked 9,798 steps today which calculates out to be about 2.6 miles














Island of Amorgos; July 3, 2010, Saturday:
Amorgos is an oblong island of 47 square miles with some of the highest cliffs in Europe, and has been inhabited since prehistoric times (settled since the 4th century BC). The island has two natural ports, Katapola (main) and Aegiali, with a population of
1,850 inhabitants. Part of the island was named As Is, where the temple of the goddess Aphrodite stood.


We visited the Hozoviotissa Monastery, built hundreds of feet into the cliff face, the steps up were strenuous. We were given free time to explore on our own in the port city after our monastery visit, and returned to our ship for lunch and departure for Santorini.




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I walked 6,535 steps today which calculates out to be about 1.7 miles.






Island of Santorini; July 4, 2010, Sunday:
Santorini (or Thera) is unquestionably the most extraordinary island with its breathtaking beauty. A catastrophic volcanic eruption in the 17th century BC created a great bay, but destroyed the inhabitants of Crete with the tsunami it created, and the Minoan culture on that island was destroyed.













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The late Professor Spyridon Marinatos who started excavations in 1967 found There to be the best known Minoan site outside of Crete. The civilization thrive between 3,000 to 2,000 BC, and reached its peak in 2,000 to 1,580 BC.

The average depth of water is 1,200 meters (or 3,900 feet), and looking down from Santorini, one is able to see the other two uninhabited islands, Thirasia and Aspronisi, that forms the crater.



We visited the Prehistoric Museum in Fira (capital) as our first activity to look at some of the best preserved finds of Akrotiri, the prehistoric city of the 17th century BC. We were also coached to Oia, a picturesque village located on the cliffs at the
northernmost tip of the island to spend a few hours.



According to my pedometer, I walked only 280 steps, but know it's wrong, so I would estimate my walk as approximately 2.5 miles today.



Please continue with Naxos to Athens, Part III.

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