Red sticks and bullet holes

Trip Start Jan 01, 1975
1
48
51
Trip End Jan 01, 2010


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Flag of United States  , Louisiana
Friday, November 26, 1993

I visited here in November 1993 with Mom and Dad and brother Craig. We'd been on a Thanksgiving tour of New Orleans and plantations and spent a night in Baton Rouge. I remember thinking how UGLY and industrial looking all the blazing gas or oil furnaces on the river looked, like Sherman had struck again!

After spending the night, Craig and I went out and visited the capitol the next morning. Mom and Dad stayed at the motel. Interesting capitol, you do feel some gentility there, but mostly the idea of the Huey Long legacy of corruption. We saw the bullet holes in the wall where he was shot and killed. He's buried on the grounds.

Some facts:
Louisiana was the EIGHTEENTH state.
Date: April 30, 1812
State Nickname: Pelican State
Key Words: Bluffs, Mississippi, French, Long, Red Stick, Assassination

In 1699 Pierre Le Moyne spotted a 30-foot high maypole separating the hunting grounds of two Indian tribes. It was dripping with blood. Baton Rouge, for "red stick," is the name that stuck for this place on the bluffs of the Mississippi River.

One-third of Baton Rouge is of French descent, and the accent can be heard throughout the area. It became the state capital in 1882. The unusual capitol was built in 1932, under the aegis of Governor Huey P. Long. It has 34 stories and is 450 feet high. Long was assassinated in the lobby of the building - the walls are nicked with bullet holes - and is buried on the front lawn.

Louisiana State University (LSU) is located here. It is home of The Southern Review, one of the world's most prestigious literary journals, founded in the 1930's.

Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Population 225,702
Elevation 58
Central time zone
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