First Landing

Trip Start Dec 07, 2010
1
43
66
Trip End Jan 14, 2011


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MS Expedition

Flag of Antarctica  ,
Monday, January 3, 2011

Daily Programme

Tuesday 4th Jan, 2011

Cuverville Island,

Neko Harbour

Sunrise: 02:45 Sunset: 23:44

Cuverville Island was discovered by Gerlache's Belgian Antarctic expedition in 1897-1899. The island was named by Charcot for a vice-admiral in the French Navy.

Neko Harbour was named after the whale factory ship Neko that operated along the Antarctic Peninsula in 1911-12, and again in 1923- 24. Neko Harbour was first seen and charted by Adrien de Gerlache´s Belgian Expedition of 1897-99.

08:30 Landing: We will have a landing on Cuverville Island. The disembarkation order will be Scott, Amundsen, Ross and Shackleton.

14:00 Landing: We will have a landing at Neko Harbour. This will be our continental landing. The disembarkation order will be Amundsen, Ross, Shackleton and Scott.

18:30 Recap and Briefing: Please join the Expedition Staff in the lounge for a recap of the day’s events and an overview of tomorrow’s itinerary.

21:15 Movie: Antarctica (38 minutes)

"I now belong to a higher cult of mortals, for I have seen the Albatross."

- Robert Cushman Murphy

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Expedition Log

by Scott MacPhail & Osi Shahaf

Monday, 3rd January 2011

We were all anxious to chow down lunch and get into the zodiacs and walk on the beach among the little men in waiter costumes. As we approached the shore we all smiled as we saw the black and white little guys making their way into, and along the water. There were both Gentoo and Chinstrap penguins sitting on their nests, and we hopped out of the boats to get a closer look. We were so lucky to witness the newborn furry chicks that were clambering for food amoung the Gentoos and the small recently born chicks of the Chinstrap penguins. It was all happening at once, the skuas and giant petrels flying overhead looking for an egg to steal, the penguins stealing each others rocks to build up their nests, and the non-stop action in the daily lives of these amazing creatures. The walk along the beach took us to where 2 Elephant seals were lazing about behind boulders, and for those who ventured further on, found the remains of a Crabeater seal, that had been dead for some time. The sights, sounds and smells were overwhelming as our cameras were going off like machine guns, as we witnessed these amazing events going on in front of us. It seemed like no time at all when we had to make our way back to the ship and get together with everyone and go over what each other had witnessed. The stories were fast and furious and hilarious. We also had our 5 winner of the guess the convergence crossing, it was crossed at 1800 last night and the closest guess was Gerry Bulwalda. Congratulations Gerry.

Frank topped off the evening with a presentation of suggestions on how to take the perfect polar photography shot for the days to come. Following this we prepared our cabins as we sailed down the Bransfield Strait staring out at the amazing scenery as we made our way south to tomorrow’s landing areas.

The Bransfield Strait runs between the South Shetlands Archipelago and the Antarctic Peninsula. Named after Cpt. Edward Bransfield, who on board of the brig Williams, and having William Smith (the discoverer of the South Shetland Islands) as pilot, charted the South Shetlands and part of the Northern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula known as "Trinity Land", in 1821. Great Britain claims that Cpt. Edward Bransfield was the first man to discover the Antarctic Continent.

This is not accepted by the Americans and the Russians, who have their own Explorers who are supposed to be the ones who discovered the Continent.


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