Shamanic Ceremony at the farm

Trip Start Aug 07, 2008
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62
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Trip End Dec 10, 2009


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Flag of Ecuador  ,
Thursday, May 7, 2009

Well, itīs not surprising that iīm STILL here at the farm. It is genuinely hard to leave and numbers have swelled to over 25 people recently and perhaps even a few more in the run up to the Shamanic ceremony.

Yep, we had a Shamanic ceremony this week, which started by everyone taking a dose (or more...) of San Pedro (hallucinogenic īmedicineī) and then involved 8+ hours of ceremonies - followed by a day of still feeling like youīre utterly fucked. Without the excellent ceremonial elements to focus the energy and experience, it would have been utterly pointless. With it, it was without a doubt the most profound and spiritual thing i have done in my life - a real turning point. A lot of things were answered that night, but i think the (hopefully positive) changes will continue to take place as they get worked out in the weeks/months ahead. The event itself and following day was also incredible - the energy, the friendliness, the Shamans, the īsupport teamī - everything. And the farm now has 20 Indians (5 on the roof...) and a wolf as spirit guards. It is hard/impossible to even begin to explain the experience, but i felt obliged to share!

In the other news from the farm...

...the chicken tractor is now under construction - hopefully itīll be sturdy as the 500L water tank on the roof might otherwise cause the new occupants some serious discomfort. Bri, Stefan and I went to a local livestock market to buy a cockerel and 3 pigs - one of which has been named Migelito after me :-) Aside from being an interesting experience in its own right, it was another off-the-farm opportunity to get some more meat into the system. 3 roast pork breakfasts, from the man who was also selling smoked pigs heads (only $4 each) and live pigs. We might need to go back there at some point soon. Scott the pig has since died, the dogs killed all 6 chickens and we suspect scorpions are costing us some guinea pigs. Itīs been a bad few weeks for the animals... A tepee is taking shape on the horizon, the Laguna still has holes and the hot showers are rarely hot. Always more work to do.

During an off-day in Quito, I went and scrambled up a 4700m peak with some awesome ridges. It really brought back the pre-basejump feelings and watching planes coming in to land far below me confirmed it is certainly not out of my system - far from it - but god knows when the next time will be! The ascent is supposed to take 3 hours, but despite taking a far more challenging route (i love scrambling and flat easy paths suck) i was back at the base in 4 hours. Mental note - take food and water next time!

Last night 6 of us from the farm went out for a $10 meal, a real splurge given we eat for free at the farm (or $1.50 in town) but it was OH so good. Beef with a mushroom and bacon sauce and cheesy roast potatoes. Itīs amazing how much you miss it - i literally licked the plate clean. And weīre off for steaks later - yep, itīs one of those expensive times at the mo :-)

I think iīll be leaving the farm within days - new rules mean you
can only spend 90 days a year in Ecuador and iīve set to see most of it!

UPDATE - 9/6/09

We have also started playing a bi-weekly footie game against the camioneta driver cooperative. We take turns to buy the beers and post-game food. Having packed our entire time (and subs, spectators and fans) into 2 pickups, much to the amusement of Malchingi, we lost our second game by a more respectable 6-4. Afterwards, they had found a bus to take us to the food venue (a wifeīs restaurant) - our own private bus. Awesome. The whole afternoon was great fun and a good chance to meet the locals again - the only blot on the horizon being the fact that after only playing half the time, i felt like i had been hit by a bus - i blame the altitude.
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