Oh Dr Beeching!!

Trip Start May 22, 2010
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Trip End Oct 31, 2010


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Where I stayed
Alan and Alison's home

Flag of United Kingdom  , England,
Thursday, October 21, 2010

The Wrekin is a 1334 foot hill that dominates the Shropshire countryside because the rest of it is so flat. The local saying, 'all around the Wrekin' means a longwinded route or explanation. We had discovered yesterday that there was a series of caches that went around the Wrekin, so that was our first target for the day.

It was a lovely drive although the caches were not easy to find. We had to be satisfied with 6 out of 9 – although 2 of the 3 we couldn’t find had been not found for a while which made us feel a bit better. We managed to get some nice photos of the countryside turning colour although we couldn’t go up the hill itself because of road works being done in the area.

We then went to Wellington which is rather smaller than the one in NZ. We found a couple of caches at a closed school and a closed railway line before we headed for the centre. It looked as though the recession had had an effect here as there were a number of closed shops. We had lunch in a café with lovely staff although indifferent food then checked out the covered market.

We then spent the rest of the afternoon driving around the area caching. It was a great afternoon for this as it stayed fine and even warmed up as the afternoon went on. We did a few short walks and visited other sites on railway lines closed by Dr Beeching. The  rhyme popular at the time was repeated

"Oh! Dr. Beeching, what have you done?
There once were lots of trains to catch, but soon there will be none!
I'll have to buy a bike, 'cause I can't afford a car.
Oh! Dr. Beeching! What a naughty man you are.

but it was also pointed out that the lines closed had been running at a loss for sometime.

We also found a number of caches at bridges over the Perry River which meanders its way around the area we were in. This is a tributary of the Severn. As usual the nicest caches were at churches although we were nearly caught at one as we were filling in the log when a person pulled up outside the church. We found another one at a water pump and the nearby notice said it had been provided by a local family for the use of the village.

We got back just as it got dark and had a peaceful evening in front of the TV.
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