Talat Wan-Atit

Trip Start Aug 08, 2009
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8
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Trip End Jun 01, 2010


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Flag of Thailand  , Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya,
Sunday, August 30, 2009

The sunday market in Tharua isn't exactly like the cute little farmer's market they have every Sunday in West Seattle.
 Tharua is famous for the giant Reclining Buddha, as in the picture. Giant might be an understatement for how big it is.
 Khaowfang and I got some flowers and incense sticks to do our offerings to the Buddha. Except then it started to rain. I mean, Thailand rain, not a wimpy drizzle. The whole place was full of so much activity and it smelled heavily of incense everywhere. Even in the rain, there were people dancing and playing music walking around the Buddha, it was actually really good. Within 10 minutes, Khaowfang and I were already drenched. We took our little gold pieces of paper to attach them to the Buddha to pay our respects. I looked up for a moment at the Buddha, with rain pouring down the side of the face in streaks with the little smile. I'm not huge on religion, but something there sort of struck me, made me take a step back. It was powerful, I felt connected for a brief moment to  Buddhism. I can't say that I agree with the belief that all life is suffering when it is all we have, but it's unlike anything else. The little exposure that I've had to Christianity, Islam, and Judaism is completely different, that's all I can really say.
 Wading through ankle deep water, we went inside the temple and Khaowfang tried explaining something about success when you pray and attempt to lift these elephant figures with handles with the ring finger. If you pray and can lift it the first time, then pray and are unable to lift it the second time, you will be successful in whatever you pray for. I didn't really understand Khaowfang in broken English, so when I went to do it I just picked it up twice thinking I did it right because I had a strong ring finger or something. I'll try again next week. Khaowfang put a little gold speck on my forehead and I did the same for her. It means that you're lucky. 
 We stayed for a little less than an hour because of the rain. We were literally more than ankle deep in the water and there was the loudest thunder I've ever heard. I almost thought there were gunshots and cannons, that's how intense it was. We got home fully drenched. It was completely worth it just to see what people here do on a normal Sunday morning. It was pretty fun.
 I'm still adjusting to life here, which is a lot more relaxed without the amount of schoolwork and activities there were in America. I don't have much schoolwork because I don't speak Thai, otherwise I'm sure it would be much different. Lunch everyday is a choice between noodles and rice, but we have a whole hour. I don't know if my Thai is improving or not, but I'm starting to enjoy my school day a lot more, playing volleyball after school and having ice cube fights with my friends. You don't need to speak Thai to understand the shock of having a cold icecube slipped down the back of your shirt. Hopefully the other aspects of living here will start to improve as well. Oh, and Talat Wan-Atit means Sunday market in Thai.
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Comments

mswmommy
mswmommy on

school
Alaine, you're amazing to be doing school in a brand new language! When I went for a semester at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok it was pretty easy on the language front because the classes were in English! The rest of them time I learned some Thai, but not at the level you are doing - way to go on being so willing to experience completely new adventures!

jjmason
jjmason on

Ahh the rain
I remember the downpour of rain that would come out of nowhere. It's like being in a waterfall or strong shower outside. There was flooding in Bangkok when I was there and I had to go to the doctor and even in the doctor's office I had to wade through water. Hmmm, didn't feel very clean or sterile!! LOVE LOVE LOVE the pictures of you, thanks for getting you in some gorgeous. You look great and I'm glad you are getting to see some new places, and have new experiences like riding an elephant! yah!
Love you!

nwflyer
nwflyer on

Good to know.
Alaine, G'pa told me about your blog and I got on it. Amazing. Like you said in one of your ealier blogs, the hardest part is at first, then you adapt, you just have to. I look forward to hearing more about your time there. Thailand was always my favorite Asian country; very friendly people who seem to really like Americans, probably anyone. Good looking people too. The gold offerings to Buddha bring back some memories as do the photos you took at the ruins. Amazing how steep they make the stairways at the temples, and just how 'busy' they look. I've forwarded you a couple of emails to your account filling you in on some things going on back here. Love you and miss you. Dad.

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